Lymphoid hyperplasia of the colon and its association with underlying allergic airway diseases

Masaya Iwamuro, Sakiko Hiraoka, Hiroyuki Okada, Yoshinari Kawai, Yoshio Miyabe, Katsuyoshi Takata, Seiji Kawano, Kazuhide Yamamoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of lymphoid hyperplasia in the lower gastrointestinal tract and its role in patients undergoing colonoscopic examinations, particularly focusing on any allergic predisposition. Methods: A database search performed at the Department of Gastroenterology at Onomichi Municipal Hospital identified seven patients with lymphoid hyperplasia in the large intestine (i.e., cecum, colon, and/or rectum). Data regarding the endoscopic, biological, and pathological examinations performed and the allergic histories for each patient were retrospectively reviewed from the clinical records. Results: Median age of the patients (four males, three females) was 50 years. Lymphoid hyperplasia was seen in the cecum (n = 5), ascending colon (n = 2), and transverse colon (n = 1). Six patients (85.7 %) had one of the allergic airway diseases: allergic rhinoconjunctivitis for pollen (n = 3), bronchial asthma (n = 1), infantile asthma (n = 1), or allergic bronchitis (n = 1). Drug allergy (n = 3) and urticaria (n = 2) were also found. All seven patients had one or more allergic diseases; however, none had a history of food allergy. Blood tests for allergens revealed that six patients (85.7 %) had positive reactions to inherent allergens, whereas only one patient had a positive reaction to food allergens. Conclusions: Our results indicate that lymphoid hyperplasia in the large intestine may be associated with allergic airway diseases rather than with food allergies; thus, its presence may be useful to detect patients with underlying airway hyperreactivity.

Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal of Colorectal Disease
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Sep 26 2015

Fingerprint

Hyperplasia
Colon
Allergens
Food Hypersensitivity
Cecum
Large Intestine
Asthma
Lower Gastrointestinal Tract
Municipal Hospitals
Drug Hypersensitivity
Ascending Colon
Transverse Colon
Bronchitis
Urticaria
Hematologic Tests
Gastroenterology
Pollen
Rectum
Databases
Food

Keywords

  • Colonoscopy
  • Colorectal disease
  • Food hypersensitivity
  • Lymphoid hyperplasia
  • Seasonal allergic rhinitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Lymphoid hyperplasia of the colon and its association with underlying allergic airway diseases. / Iwamuro, Masaya; Hiraoka, Sakiko; Okada, Hiroyuki; Kawai, Yoshinari; Miyabe, Yoshio; Takata, Katsuyoshi; Kawano, Seiji; Yamamoto, Kazuhide.

In: International Journal of Colorectal Disease, 26.09.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of lymphoid hyperplasia in the lower gastrointestinal tract and its role in patients undergoing colonoscopic examinations, particularly focusing on any allergic predisposition. Methods: A database search performed at the Department of Gastroenterology at Onomichi Municipal Hospital identified seven patients with lymphoid hyperplasia in the large intestine (i.e., cecum, colon, and/or rectum). Data regarding the endoscopic, biological, and pathological examinations performed and the allergic histories for each patient were retrospectively reviewed from the clinical records. Results: Median age of the patients (four males, three females) was 50 years. Lymphoid hyperplasia was seen in the cecum (n = 5), ascending colon (n = 2), and transverse colon (n = 1). Six patients (85.7 {\%}) had one of the allergic airway diseases: allergic rhinoconjunctivitis for pollen (n = 3), bronchial asthma (n = 1), infantile asthma (n = 1), or allergic bronchitis (n = 1). Drug allergy (n = 3) and urticaria (n = 2) were also found. All seven patients had one or more allergic diseases; however, none had a history of food allergy. Blood tests for allergens revealed that six patients (85.7 {\%}) had positive reactions to inherent allergens, whereas only one patient had a positive reaction to food allergens. Conclusions: Our results indicate that lymphoid hyperplasia in the large intestine may be associated with allergic airway diseases rather than with food allergies; thus, its presence may be useful to detect patients with underlying airway hyperreactivity.",
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AU - Okada, Hiroyuki

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AU - Miyabe, Yoshio

AU - Takata, Katsuyoshi

AU - Kawano, Seiji

AU - Yamamoto, Kazuhide

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