Lung perfusion scintigraphy to detect chronic lung allograft dysfunction after living-donor lobar lung transplantation

Haruchika Yamamoto, Seiichiro Sugimoto, Takeshi Kurosaki, Kentaroh Miyoshi, Shinji Otani, Mikio Okazaki, Masaomi Yamane, Takahiro Oto, Shinichi Toyooka

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Abstract

Because chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD) develops predominantly on one side after bilateral living-donor lobar lung transplantation (LDLLT), lung perfusion scintigraphy (Q-scinti) was expected to show a perfusion shift to the contralateral unaffected lung with the development of CLAD. Our study examined the potential usefulness of Q-scinti in the diagnosis of CLAD after bilateral LDLLT. We conducted a single-center retrospective cohort study of 58 recipients of bilateral LDLLT. The unilateral shift values on Q-scinti were calculated and compared between the CLAD group (N = 27) and the non-CLAD group (N = 31) from 5 years before to 5 years after the diagnosis of CLAD. The unilateral shift values in Q-scinti were significantly higher in the CLAD group than in the non-CLAD group from 5 years before the diagnosis of CLAD to 5 years after the diagnosis (P < 0.05). The unilateral shift values in Q-scinti were significantly correlated with the percent baseline values of the forced expiratory volume in 1 s (P = 0.0037), the total lung capacity (P = 0.0028), and the forced vital capacity (P = 0.00024) at the diagnosis of CLAD. In patients developing unilateral CLAD after bilateral LDLLT, Q-scinti showed a unilateral perfusion shift to the contralateral unaffected lung. Thus, Q-scinti appears to have the potential to predict unilateral CLAD after bilateral LDLLT.

Original languageEnglish
Article number10595
JournalScientific reports
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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