Local left ventricular epicardial J waves and late potentials in Brugada syndrome patients with inferolateral early repolarization pattern

Satoshi Nagase, Masamichi Tanaka, Hiroshi Morita, Koji Nakagawa, Tadashi Wada, Masato Murakami, Nobuhiro Nishii, Kazufumi Nakamura, Hiroshi Itoh, Tohru Ohe, Kengo F. Kusano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: Brugada syndrome (BrS) is characterized by J-point or ST-segment elevation on electrocardiograms (ECGs) and increased risk of ventricular fibrillation (VF). In BrS, epicardial depolarization abnormality with delayed potential on the right ventricular outflow tract is reportedly the predominant mechanism underlying VF. Yet VF occurrence is also associated with early repolarization (ER) pattern in the inferolateral ECG leads, which may represent the inferior and/or left lateral ventricular myocardium. The aim of this study was to examine epicardial electrograms recorded directly at the left ventricle (LV) in BrS patients after VF episodes. Methods: In 12 BrS patients who had experienced VF episodes and 17 control subjects, a multipolar catheter was introduced into the left lateral coronary vein for unipolar and bipolar electrogram recordings at the LV epicardium. Both inferior and lateral ER patterns on ECG were observed in three BrS patients and six control subjects. Results: In the epicardium, prominent J waves were detected using unipolar recording, and potentials after the QRS complex were detected using bipolar recording in three of the 12 BrS patients. These three patients also showed both inferior and lateral ER patterns on ECG. Neither prominent J waves nor potentials after the QRS complex were recorded at the endocardium of the LV in any of these three patients; nor were they seen at the epicardium in any of the control subjects. These features were accentuated on pilsicainide administration (n = 2) but diminished on constant atrial pacing (n = 3) and isoproterenol administration (n = 1). The J waves observed through unipolar recording coincided with the potentials after QRS complex observed through bipolar recording and with the inferolateral ER patterns on ECG. Conclusions: We recorded prominent J waves in unipolar electrogram and potentials after QRS complex in bipolar electrogram at the LV epicardium in BrS patients with global ER pattern. The prominent J waves coincided with the potentials after QRS complex and the inferolateral ER pattern on ECG. The characteristics of the inferolateral ER pattern on ECG in these patients primarily represent depolarization feature.

Original languageEnglish
Article number14
JournalFrontiers in Physiology
Volume8
Issue numberJAN
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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Brugada Syndrome
Electrocardiography
Ventricular Fibrillation
Pericardium
Heart Ventricles
Endocardium
Isoproterenol
Coronary Vessels
Myocardium
Catheters

Keywords

  • Brugada syndrome
  • Delayed potential
  • Early repolarization
  • Epicardium
  • J wave syndrome
  • Left ventricle

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Local left ventricular epicardial J waves and late potentials in Brugada syndrome patients with inferolateral early repolarization pattern. / Nagase, Satoshi; Tanaka, Masamichi; Morita, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Koji; Wada, Tadashi; Murakami, Masato; Nishii, Nobuhiro; Nakamura, Kazufumi; Itoh, Hiroshi; Ohe, Tohru; Kusano, Kengo F.

In: Frontiers in Physiology, Vol. 8, No. JAN, 14, 2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: Brugada syndrome (BrS) is characterized by J-point or ST-segment elevation on electrocardiograms (ECGs) and increased risk of ventricular fibrillation (VF). In BrS, epicardial depolarization abnormality with delayed potential on the right ventricular outflow tract is reportedly the predominant mechanism underlying VF. Yet VF occurrence is also associated with early repolarization (ER) pattern in the inferolateral ECG leads, which may represent the inferior and/or left lateral ventricular myocardium. The aim of this study was to examine epicardial electrograms recorded directly at the left ventricle (LV) in BrS patients after VF episodes. Methods: In 12 BrS patients who had experienced VF episodes and 17 control subjects, a multipolar catheter was introduced into the left lateral coronary vein for unipolar and bipolar electrogram recordings at the LV epicardium. Both inferior and lateral ER patterns on ECG were observed in three BrS patients and six control subjects. Results: In the epicardium, prominent J waves were detected using unipolar recording, and potentials after the QRS complex were detected using bipolar recording in three of the 12 BrS patients. These three patients also showed both inferior and lateral ER patterns on ECG. Neither prominent J waves nor potentials after the QRS complex were recorded at the endocardium of the LV in any of these three patients; nor were they seen at the epicardium in any of the control subjects. These features were accentuated on pilsicainide administration (n = 2) but diminished on constant atrial pacing (n = 3) and isoproterenol administration (n = 1). The J waves observed through unipolar recording coincided with the potentials after QRS complex observed through bipolar recording and with the inferolateral ER patterns on ECG. Conclusions: We recorded prominent J waves in unipolar electrogram and potentials after QRS complex in bipolar electrogram at the LV epicardium in BrS patients with global ER pattern. The prominent J waves coincided with the potentials after QRS complex and the inferolateral ER pattern on ECG. The characteristics of the inferolateral ER pattern on ECG in these patients primarily represent depolarization feature.",
keywords = "Brugada syndrome, Delayed potential, Early repolarization, Epicardium, J wave syndrome, Left ventricle",
author = "Satoshi Nagase and Masamichi Tanaka and Hiroshi Morita and Koji Nakagawa and Tadashi Wada and Masato Murakami and Nobuhiro Nishii and Kazufumi Nakamura and Hiroshi Itoh and Tohru Ohe and Kusano, {Kengo F.}",
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T1 - Local left ventricular epicardial J waves and late potentials in Brugada syndrome patients with inferolateral early repolarization pattern

AU - Nagase, Satoshi

AU - Tanaka, Masamichi

AU - Morita, Hiroshi

AU - Nakagawa, Koji

AU - Wada, Tadashi

AU - Murakami, Masato

AU - Nishii, Nobuhiro

AU - Nakamura, Kazufumi

AU - Itoh, Hiroshi

AU - Ohe, Tohru

AU - Kusano, Kengo F.

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Background: Brugada syndrome (BrS) is characterized by J-point or ST-segment elevation on electrocardiograms (ECGs) and increased risk of ventricular fibrillation (VF). In BrS, epicardial depolarization abnormality with delayed potential on the right ventricular outflow tract is reportedly the predominant mechanism underlying VF. Yet VF occurrence is also associated with early repolarization (ER) pattern in the inferolateral ECG leads, which may represent the inferior and/or left lateral ventricular myocardium. The aim of this study was to examine epicardial electrograms recorded directly at the left ventricle (LV) in BrS patients after VF episodes. Methods: In 12 BrS patients who had experienced VF episodes and 17 control subjects, a multipolar catheter was introduced into the left lateral coronary vein for unipolar and bipolar electrogram recordings at the LV epicardium. Both inferior and lateral ER patterns on ECG were observed in three BrS patients and six control subjects. Results: In the epicardium, prominent J waves were detected using unipolar recording, and potentials after the QRS complex were detected using bipolar recording in three of the 12 BrS patients. These three patients also showed both inferior and lateral ER patterns on ECG. Neither prominent J waves nor potentials after the QRS complex were recorded at the endocardium of the LV in any of these three patients; nor were they seen at the epicardium in any of the control subjects. These features were accentuated on pilsicainide administration (n = 2) but diminished on constant atrial pacing (n = 3) and isoproterenol administration (n = 1). The J waves observed through unipolar recording coincided with the potentials after QRS complex observed through bipolar recording and with the inferolateral ER patterns on ECG. Conclusions: We recorded prominent J waves in unipolar electrogram and potentials after QRS complex in bipolar electrogram at the LV epicardium in BrS patients with global ER pattern. The prominent J waves coincided with the potentials after QRS complex and the inferolateral ER pattern on ECG. The characteristics of the inferolateral ER pattern on ECG in these patients primarily represent depolarization feature.

AB - Background: Brugada syndrome (BrS) is characterized by J-point or ST-segment elevation on electrocardiograms (ECGs) and increased risk of ventricular fibrillation (VF). In BrS, epicardial depolarization abnormality with delayed potential on the right ventricular outflow tract is reportedly the predominant mechanism underlying VF. Yet VF occurrence is also associated with early repolarization (ER) pattern in the inferolateral ECG leads, which may represent the inferior and/or left lateral ventricular myocardium. The aim of this study was to examine epicardial electrograms recorded directly at the left ventricle (LV) in BrS patients after VF episodes. Methods: In 12 BrS patients who had experienced VF episodes and 17 control subjects, a multipolar catheter was introduced into the left lateral coronary vein for unipolar and bipolar electrogram recordings at the LV epicardium. Both inferior and lateral ER patterns on ECG were observed in three BrS patients and six control subjects. Results: In the epicardium, prominent J waves were detected using unipolar recording, and potentials after the QRS complex were detected using bipolar recording in three of the 12 BrS patients. These three patients also showed both inferior and lateral ER patterns on ECG. Neither prominent J waves nor potentials after the QRS complex were recorded at the endocardium of the LV in any of these three patients; nor were they seen at the epicardium in any of the control subjects. These features were accentuated on pilsicainide administration (n = 2) but diminished on constant atrial pacing (n = 3) and isoproterenol administration (n = 1). The J waves observed through unipolar recording coincided with the potentials after QRS complex observed through bipolar recording and with the inferolateral ER patterns on ECG. Conclusions: We recorded prominent J waves in unipolar electrogram and potentials after QRS complex in bipolar electrogram at the LV epicardium in BrS patients with global ER pattern. The prominent J waves coincided with the potentials after QRS complex and the inferolateral ER pattern on ECG. The characteristics of the inferolateral ER pattern on ECG in these patients primarily represent depolarization feature.

KW - Brugada syndrome

KW - Delayed potential

KW - Early repolarization

KW - Epicardium

KW - J wave syndrome

KW - Left ventricle

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