Liver fat accumulation assessed by computed tomography is an independent risk factor for diabetes mellitus in a population-based study: SESSA (Shiga Epidemiological Study of Subclinical Atherosclerosis)

for the SESSA Research Group

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1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims: Ectopic fat accumulation is related to insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus (DM). However, the effect of fatty liver on DM in non-obese individuals has not been clarified. We investigated whether liver fat accumulation assessed by computed tomography (CT) is associated with the incidence of DM. Methods: In a prospective population-based study, 640 Japanese men were followed up for 5 years. The liver to spleen (L/S) ratio of the CT attenuation value was used as the liver fat accumulation index. We calculated the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for the DM incidence of per 1 standard deviation (SD) lower L/S and those of L/S < 1.0 compared with L/S ≥ 1.0, using logistic regression models. Results: Both per 1 SD lower L/S and L/S < 1.0 were significantly associated with a risk for DM incidence (1 SD lower L/S: OR = 1.57, 95%CI = 1.14–2.16; L/S < 1.0: OR = 2.27, 95%CI = 1.00–5.14). The relationship between L/S and incidence of DM was consistent in the obese and non-obese groups, with thresholds of BMI 25 kg/m2, waist circumference 85 cm, or visceral adipose tissue 100 cm2. Conclusions: Liver fat accumulation assessed by CT was associated with the incidence of DM.

Original languageEnglish
Article number108002
JournalDiabetes Research and Clinical Practice
Volume160
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2020

Keywords

  • CT
  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Fatty liver

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology

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