Light cycle during post-embryonic development affects adult circadian parameters of the cricket (Gryllus bimaculatus) optic lobe pacemaker

Kenji Tomioka, Yoshihiko Chiba

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The circadian pacemaker of the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus, driving the locomotor rhythm, has been localized in the optic lobe. The motion of the optic lobe pacemaker could be monitored by recording the efferent neural activity of the optic lobe from the distal cut end of the optic stalk which is a long nerve trunk connecting the medulla and lobula. We compared the circadian rhythm of the optic lobe efferents among the different developmental groups of animals, which were reared under the 24 h light-dark cycle with either of the following three light-to-dark ratios, i.e. 16-8, 12-12 or 8-16 h. Although all animals showed the electrical activity peaking in the subjective night, effects of lengthening the dark phase from 8 to 16 h on the optic lobe pacemaker occurred in the following three ways. (1) The ratio of subjective night-to-day increased about 2 times, (2) the rising phase was lengthened by 3 h, and (3) the rhythm's phase to the light cycle advanced by about 4 h. Possible mechanisms and the adaptive significance of these pacemaker plasticity are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)273-276
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Insect Physiology
Volume35
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1989
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

optic lobe
Gryllidae
Gryllus bimaculatus
Photoperiod
Embryonic Development
embryogenesis
photoperiod
Circadian Rhythm
Light
optics
circadian rhythm
animals
nerve tissue

Keywords

  • Circadian rhythm
  • cricket
  • neural activity
  • optic lobe
  • photoperiod

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Insect Science
  • Physiology

Cite this

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abstract = "The circadian pacemaker of the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus, driving the locomotor rhythm, has been localized in the optic lobe. The motion of the optic lobe pacemaker could be monitored by recording the efferent neural activity of the optic lobe from the distal cut end of the optic stalk which is a long nerve trunk connecting the medulla and lobula. We compared the circadian rhythm of the optic lobe efferents among the different developmental groups of animals, which were reared under the 24 h light-dark cycle with either of the following three light-to-dark ratios, i.e. 16-8, 12-12 or 8-16 h. Although all animals showed the electrical activity peaking in the subjective night, effects of lengthening the dark phase from 8 to 16 h on the optic lobe pacemaker occurred in the following three ways. (1) The ratio of subjective night-to-day increased about 2 times, (2) the rising phase was lengthened by 3 h, and (3) the rhythm's phase to the light cycle advanced by about 4 h. Possible mechanisms and the adaptive significance of these pacemaker plasticity are discussed.",
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N2 - The circadian pacemaker of the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus, driving the locomotor rhythm, has been localized in the optic lobe. The motion of the optic lobe pacemaker could be monitored by recording the efferent neural activity of the optic lobe from the distal cut end of the optic stalk which is a long nerve trunk connecting the medulla and lobula. We compared the circadian rhythm of the optic lobe efferents among the different developmental groups of animals, which were reared under the 24 h light-dark cycle with either of the following three light-to-dark ratios, i.e. 16-8, 12-12 or 8-16 h. Although all animals showed the electrical activity peaking in the subjective night, effects of lengthening the dark phase from 8 to 16 h on the optic lobe pacemaker occurred in the following three ways. (1) The ratio of subjective night-to-day increased about 2 times, (2) the rising phase was lengthened by 3 h, and (3) the rhythm's phase to the light cycle advanced by about 4 h. Possible mechanisms and the adaptive significance of these pacemaker plasticity are discussed.

AB - The circadian pacemaker of the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus, driving the locomotor rhythm, has been localized in the optic lobe. The motion of the optic lobe pacemaker could be monitored by recording the efferent neural activity of the optic lobe from the distal cut end of the optic stalk which is a long nerve trunk connecting the medulla and lobula. We compared the circadian rhythm of the optic lobe efferents among the different developmental groups of animals, which were reared under the 24 h light-dark cycle with either of the following three light-to-dark ratios, i.e. 16-8, 12-12 or 8-16 h. Although all animals showed the electrical activity peaking in the subjective night, effects of lengthening the dark phase from 8 to 16 h on the optic lobe pacemaker occurred in the following three ways. (1) The ratio of subjective night-to-day increased about 2 times, (2) the rising phase was lengthened by 3 h, and (3) the rhythm's phase to the light cycle advanced by about 4 h. Possible mechanisms and the adaptive significance of these pacemaker plasticity are discussed.

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