Leaf water relations in Pinus densiflora Sieb. et Zucc. on different soil moisture conditions

Naoko Miki, Kosei Otsuki, Keiji Sakamoto, Takashi Nishimoto, Ken Yoshikawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

To elucidate the differences in the leaf water relations of Pinus densiflora Sieb, et Zucc. growing in different soil moisture conditions, we examined the pressure-volume curve and the diurnal changes in the stomatal conductance, the transpiration rate, and the leaf water potential. The leaf water relations were compared using field-grown 40-year-old pine trees growing on the upper and lower parts of a slope. We also compared the leaf water relations of potted 4-year-old saplings growing at pF 4.2 and pF 1.8 soil moisture levels for almost 1 year. The values of the ratio of symplasmic water at turgor loss point to symplasmic water at saturated point (V p/Vo) and bulk modulus of elasticity (ε) of both the adult trees on the upper part of the slope and the potted saplings growing on pF 4.2 soil moisture were higher than those values of both the adult trees on the lower part of the slope and the potted saplings growing on pF 1.8 soil moisture, respectively. The field-grown adult tree and the potted saplings growing under long-term water stress tended to reduce their stomatal conductance in response to the acute soil drying. It is suggested that P. densiflora growing under long-term water stress rapidly closed its stomata in response to soil drying and avoided losing water, and could also rapidly absorb water with reducing water loss because of the decrease in the leaf pressure potential derived from the high ε values.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)153-161
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Forest Research
Volume8
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2003

Fingerprint

Pinus densiflora
Pinus
water relations
Soil
soil moisture
soil water
sapling
Water
saplings
leaves
water
stomatal conductance
water stress
Dehydration
bulk modulus
drying
stomata
transpiration
elasticity
Pressure

Keywords

  • Drought resistance
  • Long-term water stress
  • Pinus densiflora
  • Pressure-volume curve
  • Stomatal conductance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Leaf water relations in Pinus densiflora Sieb. et Zucc. on different soil moisture conditions. / Miki, Naoko; Otsuki, Kosei; Sakamoto, Keiji; Nishimoto, Takashi; Yoshikawa, Ken.

In: Journal of Forest Research, Vol. 8, No. 3, 08.2003, p. 153-161.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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