Large particulate allergens can elicit mast cell-mediated anaphylaxis without exit from blood vessels as efficiently as do small soluble allergens

Li Lihua, Soichiro Yoshikawa, Takuya Ohta, Kayo Horiguchi, Yohei Kawano, Hiroshi Ohtsu, Yoshinori Yamanishi, Hajime Karasuyama

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Anaphylaxis is a rapid-onset, life-threatening allergic reaction in that IgE, mast cells and histamine are commonly involved. It can be experimentally induced in IgE-sensitized animals by intravenous injection of corresponding allergens, and the sign of anaphylactic reaction can be detected within minutes after allergen challenge. However, it remains puzzling why the anaphylactic reaction can be initiated in vivo so quickly, considering that allergens are delivered into the blood circulation while mast cells reside within peripheral tissues but not in the blood circulation. To address this issue, we compared two different forms of the same allergen, small soluble and large particulate ones, in their ability to induce anaphylaxis in IgE-sensitized mice. In contrast to our expectation, particulate allergens could induce anaphylaxis as quickly and efficiently as did soluble allergens, even though they remained inside of blood vessels. In vivo imaging analysis suggested the direct interaction of intravascular particulate allergens and perivascular mast cells across the capillary wall. Taken together with previous report that perivascular mast cells can capture IgE in the blood circulation by extending cell processes across the vessel wall, our findings imply that blood-circulating allergens, regardless of their size, can stimulate mast cells without exit from blood vessels, by means of cross-linking IgE on mast cell processes inserted into the vessel lumen, and hence initiate anaphylactic reaction so quickly.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)70-75
Number of pages6
JournalBiochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
Volume467
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 6 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Blood vessels
Anaphylaxis
Mast Cells
Allergens
Blood Vessels
Immunoglobulin E
Blood Circulation
Hemodynamics
Intravenous Injections
Histamine
Hypersensitivity
Animals
Blood
Tissue
Imaging techniques

Keywords

  • Anaphylaxis
  • Basophil
  • IgE
  • Mast cell
  • Particulate allergen

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Large particulate allergens can elicit mast cell-mediated anaphylaxis without exit from blood vessels as efficiently as do small soluble allergens. / Lihua, Li; Yoshikawa, Soichiro; Ohta, Takuya; Horiguchi, Kayo; Kawano, Yohei; Ohtsu, Hiroshi; Yamanishi, Yoshinori; Karasuyama, Hajime.

In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, Vol. 467, No. 1, 06.11.2015, p. 70-75.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lihua, Li ; Yoshikawa, Soichiro ; Ohta, Takuya ; Horiguchi, Kayo ; Kawano, Yohei ; Ohtsu, Hiroshi ; Yamanishi, Yoshinori ; Karasuyama, Hajime. / Large particulate allergens can elicit mast cell-mediated anaphylaxis without exit from blood vessels as efficiently as do small soluble allergens. In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications. 2015 ; Vol. 467, No. 1. pp. 70-75.
@article{700355c461f04fca872f1ba1329062c3,
title = "Large particulate allergens can elicit mast cell-mediated anaphylaxis without exit from blood vessels as efficiently as do small soluble allergens",
abstract = "Anaphylaxis is a rapid-onset, life-threatening allergic reaction in that IgE, mast cells and histamine are commonly involved. It can be experimentally induced in IgE-sensitized animals by intravenous injection of corresponding allergens, and the sign of anaphylactic reaction can be detected within minutes after allergen challenge. However, it remains puzzling why the anaphylactic reaction can be initiated in vivo so quickly, considering that allergens are delivered into the blood circulation while mast cells reside within peripheral tissues but not in the blood circulation. To address this issue, we compared two different forms of the same allergen, small soluble and large particulate ones, in their ability to induce anaphylaxis in IgE-sensitized mice. In contrast to our expectation, particulate allergens could induce anaphylaxis as quickly and efficiently as did soluble allergens, even though they remained inside of blood vessels. In vivo imaging analysis suggested the direct interaction of intravascular particulate allergens and perivascular mast cells across the capillary wall. Taken together with previous report that perivascular mast cells can capture IgE in the blood circulation by extending cell processes across the vessel wall, our findings imply that blood-circulating allergens, regardless of their size, can stimulate mast cells without exit from blood vessels, by means of cross-linking IgE on mast cell processes inserted into the vessel lumen, and hence initiate anaphylactic reaction so quickly.",
keywords = "Anaphylaxis, Basophil, IgE, Mast cell, Particulate allergen",
author = "Li Lihua and Soichiro Yoshikawa and Takuya Ohta and Kayo Horiguchi and Yohei Kawano and Hiroshi Ohtsu and Yoshinori Yamanishi and Hajime Karasuyama",
year = "2015",
month = "11",
day = "6",
doi = "10.1016/j.bbrc.2015.09.120",
language = "English",
volume = "467",
pages = "70--75",
journal = "Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications",
issn = "0006-291X",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Large particulate allergens can elicit mast cell-mediated anaphylaxis without exit from blood vessels as efficiently as do small soluble allergens

AU - Lihua, Li

AU - Yoshikawa, Soichiro

AU - Ohta, Takuya

AU - Horiguchi, Kayo

AU - Kawano, Yohei

AU - Ohtsu, Hiroshi

AU - Yamanishi, Yoshinori

AU - Karasuyama, Hajime

PY - 2015/11/6

Y1 - 2015/11/6

N2 - Anaphylaxis is a rapid-onset, life-threatening allergic reaction in that IgE, mast cells and histamine are commonly involved. It can be experimentally induced in IgE-sensitized animals by intravenous injection of corresponding allergens, and the sign of anaphylactic reaction can be detected within minutes after allergen challenge. However, it remains puzzling why the anaphylactic reaction can be initiated in vivo so quickly, considering that allergens are delivered into the blood circulation while mast cells reside within peripheral tissues but not in the blood circulation. To address this issue, we compared two different forms of the same allergen, small soluble and large particulate ones, in their ability to induce anaphylaxis in IgE-sensitized mice. In contrast to our expectation, particulate allergens could induce anaphylaxis as quickly and efficiently as did soluble allergens, even though they remained inside of blood vessels. In vivo imaging analysis suggested the direct interaction of intravascular particulate allergens and perivascular mast cells across the capillary wall. Taken together with previous report that perivascular mast cells can capture IgE in the blood circulation by extending cell processes across the vessel wall, our findings imply that blood-circulating allergens, regardless of their size, can stimulate mast cells without exit from blood vessels, by means of cross-linking IgE on mast cell processes inserted into the vessel lumen, and hence initiate anaphylactic reaction so quickly.

AB - Anaphylaxis is a rapid-onset, life-threatening allergic reaction in that IgE, mast cells and histamine are commonly involved. It can be experimentally induced in IgE-sensitized animals by intravenous injection of corresponding allergens, and the sign of anaphylactic reaction can be detected within minutes after allergen challenge. However, it remains puzzling why the anaphylactic reaction can be initiated in vivo so quickly, considering that allergens are delivered into the blood circulation while mast cells reside within peripheral tissues but not in the blood circulation. To address this issue, we compared two different forms of the same allergen, small soluble and large particulate ones, in their ability to induce anaphylaxis in IgE-sensitized mice. In contrast to our expectation, particulate allergens could induce anaphylaxis as quickly and efficiently as did soluble allergens, even though they remained inside of blood vessels. In vivo imaging analysis suggested the direct interaction of intravascular particulate allergens and perivascular mast cells across the capillary wall. Taken together with previous report that perivascular mast cells can capture IgE in the blood circulation by extending cell processes across the vessel wall, our findings imply that blood-circulating allergens, regardless of their size, can stimulate mast cells without exit from blood vessels, by means of cross-linking IgE on mast cell processes inserted into the vessel lumen, and hence initiate anaphylactic reaction so quickly.

KW - Anaphylaxis

KW - Basophil

KW - IgE

KW - Mast cell

KW - Particulate allergen

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84944937431&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84944937431&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.bbrc.2015.09.120

DO - 10.1016/j.bbrc.2015.09.120

M3 - Article

C2 - 26410536

AN - SCOPUS:84944937431

VL - 467

SP - 70

EP - 75

JO - Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications

JF - Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications

SN - 0006-291X

IS - 1

ER -