Juvenile Meniere's disease; a case of long-term follow-up

H. Akagi, K. Yuen, S. Kariya, M. Kosaka, Y. Kawarai, T. Ogawa, K. Nishizaki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Meniere's disease in children comprises only a small Percentage of all patients of Meniere's disease, and is known to be quite rare. A juvenile patient who has been followed for more than 8 years is reported in this paper. This 18-year-old female patient was brought to our department when she was 9 years old with a chief complaint of right-side hearing loss. She had a history of paroxysmal rotatory vertigo with accompanying headache twice per year since she was 5 years old. Right-side hearing loss and tinnitus had been noted since she was 9 years old. The hearing loss and the tinnitus were aggravated during the attacks of vertigo. Physical examinations revealed low- tone perceptive hearing loss of about 43 dB on the right ear. Caloric test revealed right canal paresis. Glycerol test results were positive. Since the vertigo attacks were episodic, and the equal-loudness contours on three- dimensional audiogram showed that aggravated hearing loss fluctuated despite medication, the patient received right-side intratympanic gentamicin injection when she was 16 years old. To date, vertigo has subsided for more than 2 years since the intratympanic injection.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)347-353
Number of pages7
JournalEquilibrium Research
Volume56
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 1997

Keywords

  • Children
  • Intratympanic gentamicin injection
  • Long-term follow-up
  • Meniere's disease
  • Three-dimensional audiogram

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Clinical Neurology

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    Akagi, H., Yuen, K., Kariya, S., Kosaka, M., Kawarai, Y., Ogawa, T., & Nishizaki, K. (1997). Juvenile Meniere's disease; a case of long-term follow-up. Equilibrium Research, 56(4), 347-353. https://doi.org/10.3757/jser.56.347