Isolation and characterization of a novel mycovirus infecting an edible mushroom, Grifola frondosa

Akiko Komatsu, Hideki Kondo, Masayuki Sato, Atsushi Kurahashi, Kozo Nishibori, Nobuhiro Suzuki, Fumihiro Fujimori

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Grifola frondosa (Maitake mushroom) is an important cultivated mushroom due to its medicinal and nutrient values. In this study, we isolated and characterized a novel partitivirus (named Grifola frondosa partitivirus 1, GfPV1) infecting a standard G. frondosa strain Gf-N2. This virus has a two-segmented dsRNA genome (dsRNA1 and dsRNA2) with nucleotide lengths of 2.3 and 2.2 kbp, respectively. The coding strand of dsRNA1 and dsRNA2 segments carries single open reading frame encoding RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) and a coat protein (CP), respectively. BLAST searches and phylogenetic analyses showed that GfPV1 is most closely related to a betapartitivirus, Lentinula edodes partitivirus 1 (RdRp <70% and CP <60% amino acid sequence identities), but the sequence divergence suggests that GfPV1 is classifiable as a new member of the genus Betapartitivirus, family Partitiviridae. The presence of GfPV1 does not affect colony morphology and fruiting body development of G. frondosa. This is the first report investigating the effects of a mycovirus infection on the colony morphology and fruiting body development of G. frondosa. Interestingly, GfPV1 accumulations markedly decreased along with the fruiting body maturation stages, suggesting the inhibition of virus multiplication during sexual phase of the G. frondosa life cycle.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)211-220
Number of pages10
JournalMycoscience
Volume60
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1 2019

Keywords

  • Betapartitivirus
  • Grifola
  • Mycovirus
  • Partitivirus
  • RdRp

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

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