Ipsilateral molar clenching induces less pain and discomfort than contralateral molar clenching in patients with unilateral anterior disc displacement of the temporomandibular joint

Yohei Kumazaki, Shigehisa Kawakami, Atsutoshi Hirata, Kazuhiro Oki, Shougo Minagi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims: To assess the influence of clenching side and location (ie, tooth) on the bite force necessary to induce pain or discomfort in patients with unilateral anterior disc displacement (ADD) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Methods: A total of 17 patients with unilateral ADD diagnosed clinically and with magnetic resonance imaging were included. A bite force meter was positioned at each of four experimental positions: the mandibular first premolars and first molars, bilaterally. Subjects were instructed to clench on the bite force meter until they felt pain or discomfort in the orofacial area and to report the location of the pain. Differences in pain location (ADD side versus contralateral side) and in the bite force thresholds for eliciting pain or discomfort were assessed by means of the paired t test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: Only 18% of subjects (3 out of 17) reported pain in the TMJ with ADD during clenching at the ipsilateral molar, whereas 65% (11 out of 17) reported joint pain during clenching on the contralateral molar (P = .005). At the molars, the mean ± standard deviation bite force necessary to induce pain was 241.2 ± 135.5 N on the side with ADD and 160.9 ± 78.0 N on the contralateral side. The mean molar bite force necessary to induce pain on the side with ADD was significantly higher than that on the contralateral side (P = .002). Conclusion: Patients with unilateral ADD had fewer reports of TMJ pain and discomfort when they were molar clenching on the ipsilateral side compared to molar clenching on the contralateral side.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)241-248
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of oral & facial pain and headache
Volume30
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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Temporomandibular Joint Disc
Bite Force
Pain
Temporomandibular Joint
Arthralgia
Pain Threshold
Bicuspid
Nonparametric Statistics
Tooth
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Keywords

  • Anterior disc displacement
  • Bite force
  • Preferred chewing side
  • Temporomandibular disorders
  • Temporomandibular joint

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Dentistry (miscellaneous)

Cite this

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title = "Ipsilateral molar clenching induces less pain and discomfort than contralateral molar clenching in patients with unilateral anterior disc displacement of the temporomandibular joint",
abstract = "Aims: To assess the influence of clenching side and location (ie, tooth) on the bite force necessary to induce pain or discomfort in patients with unilateral anterior disc displacement (ADD) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Methods: A total of 17 patients with unilateral ADD diagnosed clinically and with magnetic resonance imaging were included. A bite force meter was positioned at each of four experimental positions: the mandibular first premolars and first molars, bilaterally. Subjects were instructed to clench on the bite force meter until they felt pain or discomfort in the orofacial area and to report the location of the pain. Differences in pain location (ADD side versus contralateral side) and in the bite force thresholds for eliciting pain or discomfort were assessed by means of the paired t test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: Only 18{\%} of subjects (3 out of 17) reported pain in the TMJ with ADD during clenching at the ipsilateral molar, whereas 65{\%} (11 out of 17) reported joint pain during clenching on the contralateral molar (P = .005). At the molars, the mean ± standard deviation bite force necessary to induce pain was 241.2 ± 135.5 N on the side with ADD and 160.9 ± 78.0 N on the contralateral side. The mean molar bite force necessary to induce pain on the side with ADD was significantly higher than that on the contralateral side (P = .002). Conclusion: Patients with unilateral ADD had fewer reports of TMJ pain and discomfort when they were molar clenching on the ipsilateral side compared to molar clenching on the contralateral side.",
keywords = "Anterior disc displacement, Bite force, Preferred chewing side, Temporomandibular disorders, Temporomandibular joint",
author = "Yohei Kumazaki and Shigehisa Kawakami and Atsutoshi Hirata and Kazuhiro Oki and Shougo Minagi",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.11607/ofph.1405",
language = "English",
volume = "30",
pages = "241--248",
journal = "Journal of Oral and Facial Pain and Headache",
issn = "2333-0384",
publisher = "Quintessence Publishing Company",
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}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Ipsilateral molar clenching induces less pain and discomfort than contralateral molar clenching in patients with unilateral anterior disc displacement of the temporomandibular joint

AU - Kumazaki, Yohei

AU - Kawakami, Shigehisa

AU - Hirata, Atsutoshi

AU - Oki, Kazuhiro

AU - Minagi, Shougo

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - Aims: To assess the influence of clenching side and location (ie, tooth) on the bite force necessary to induce pain or discomfort in patients with unilateral anterior disc displacement (ADD) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Methods: A total of 17 patients with unilateral ADD diagnosed clinically and with magnetic resonance imaging were included. A bite force meter was positioned at each of four experimental positions: the mandibular first premolars and first molars, bilaterally. Subjects were instructed to clench on the bite force meter until they felt pain or discomfort in the orofacial area and to report the location of the pain. Differences in pain location (ADD side versus contralateral side) and in the bite force thresholds for eliciting pain or discomfort were assessed by means of the paired t test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: Only 18% of subjects (3 out of 17) reported pain in the TMJ with ADD during clenching at the ipsilateral molar, whereas 65% (11 out of 17) reported joint pain during clenching on the contralateral molar (P = .005). At the molars, the mean ± standard deviation bite force necessary to induce pain was 241.2 ± 135.5 N on the side with ADD and 160.9 ± 78.0 N on the contralateral side. The mean molar bite force necessary to induce pain on the side with ADD was significantly higher than that on the contralateral side (P = .002). Conclusion: Patients with unilateral ADD had fewer reports of TMJ pain and discomfort when they were molar clenching on the ipsilateral side compared to molar clenching on the contralateral side.

AB - Aims: To assess the influence of clenching side and location (ie, tooth) on the bite force necessary to induce pain or discomfort in patients with unilateral anterior disc displacement (ADD) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Methods: A total of 17 patients with unilateral ADD diagnosed clinically and with magnetic resonance imaging were included. A bite force meter was positioned at each of four experimental positions: the mandibular first premolars and first molars, bilaterally. Subjects were instructed to clench on the bite force meter until they felt pain or discomfort in the orofacial area and to report the location of the pain. Differences in pain location (ADD side versus contralateral side) and in the bite force thresholds for eliciting pain or discomfort were assessed by means of the paired t test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: Only 18% of subjects (3 out of 17) reported pain in the TMJ with ADD during clenching at the ipsilateral molar, whereas 65% (11 out of 17) reported joint pain during clenching on the contralateral molar (P = .005). At the molars, the mean ± standard deviation bite force necessary to induce pain was 241.2 ± 135.5 N on the side with ADD and 160.9 ± 78.0 N on the contralateral side. The mean molar bite force necessary to induce pain on the side with ADD was significantly higher than that on the contralateral side (P = .002). Conclusion: Patients with unilateral ADD had fewer reports of TMJ pain and discomfort when they were molar clenching on the ipsilateral side compared to molar clenching on the contralateral side.

KW - Anterior disc displacement

KW - Bite force

KW - Preferred chewing side

KW - Temporomandibular disorders

KW - Temporomandibular joint

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DO - 10.11607/ofph.1405

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