Intraspecies variation in the Kanzawa spider mite differentially affects induced defensive response in lima bean plants

Ryo Matsushima, Rika Ozawa, Masayoshi Uefune, Tetsuo Gotoh, Junji Takabayashi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Kanzawa spider mite, Tetranychus kanzawai, is a polyphagous herbivore that feeds on various plant families, including the Leguminacae. Scars made by the mite on lima bean leaves (Phaseolus lunatus) were classified into two types: white and red. We obtained two strains of mites-"White" and "Red"-by selecting individual mites based on the color of the scars. Damage made by the Red strain induced the expression of genes for both basic chitinase, which was downstream of the jasmonic acid (JA) signaling pathway, and acidic chitinase, which was downstream of the salicylic acid (SA) signaling pathway. White strain mites also induced the expression of the basic chitinase gene in infested leaves but they only slightly induced the acidic chitinase gene. The Red genotype was dominant over the White for the induction of the acidic chitinase gene. The amount of endogenous salicylates in leaves increased significantly when infested by Red strain mites but did not increase when infested by White strain mites. JA and SA are known to be involved in the production of lima bean leaf volatiles induced by T. urticae. The blend of volatiles emitted from leaves infested by the Red strain were qualitatively different from those infested by the White strain, suggesting that the SA and JA signaling pathways are differently involved in the production of lima bean leaf volatiles induced by T. kanzawai of different strains.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2501-2512
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Chemical Ecology
Volume32
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1 2006

Keywords

  • Herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs)
  • Induced indirect defense
  • Jasmonic acid
  • Phaseolus lunatus
  • Salicylic acid
  • Tetranychus kanzawai

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Biochemistry

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