Intralocus sexual conflict and offspring sex ratio

Masako Katsuki, Tomohiro Harano, Takahisa Miyatake, Kensuke Okada, David J. Hosken

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Males and females frequently have different fitness optima for shared traits, and as a result, genotypes that are high fitness as males are low fitness as females, and vice versa. When this occurs, biasing of offspring sex-ratio to reduce the production of the lower-fitness sex would be advantageous, so that for example, broods produced by high-fitness females should contain fewer sons. We tested for offspring sex-ratio biasing consistent with these predictions in broad-horned flour beetles. We found that in both wild-type beetles and populations subject to artificial selection for high- and low-fitness males, offspring sex ratios were biased in the predicted direction: low-fitness females produced an excess of sons, whereas high-fitness females produced an excess of daughters. Thus, these beetles are able to adaptively bias sex ratio and recoup indirect fitness benefits of mate choice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)193-197
Number of pages5
JournalEcology Letters
Volume15
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

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sexual conflict
sex ratio
fitness
Gnatocerus cornutus
Coleoptera
beetle
artificial selection
mating behavior
prediction
gender
genotype
mate choice

Keywords

  • Beetle
  • Sex ratio
  • Sexual conflict
  • Sexual selection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

Intralocus sexual conflict and offspring sex ratio. / Katsuki, Masako; Harano, Tomohiro; Miyatake, Takahisa; Okada, Kensuke; Hosken, David J.

In: Ecology Letters, Vol. 15, No. 3, 2012, p. 193-197.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Katsuki, Masako ; Harano, Tomohiro ; Miyatake, Takahisa ; Okada, Kensuke ; Hosken, David J. / Intralocus sexual conflict and offspring sex ratio. In: Ecology Letters. 2012 ; Vol. 15, No. 3. pp. 193-197.
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