Interconnection of ferro-periclase controls subducted slab morphology at the top of the lower mantle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The electrical conductivity of mantle rocks during phase transformation from ringwoodite to silicate perovskite and ferro-periclase was measured at 25 GPa and various temperatures ranging from 1300 to 1900 K. The electrical conductivity was high at the initial stage of annealing, suggesting that ferro-periclase forms interconnected layers in aggregates of silicate perovskite and ferro-periclase that are representative of lower mantle rock. At 1900 K the electrical conductivity quickly decreased and reached that of silicate perovskite, suggesting the cut-off of the interconnected ferro-periclase because of rounding of crystals. Below 1700 K, the high conductivity values were maintained for experimental duration. The interconnection of ferro-periclase, which has a lower viscosity than silicate perovskite, can be maintained in a cold descending slab over geological time scales (~1 My), indicating that a colder slab is less viscous than the warmer mantle surrounding it. The low-viscosity slab can be prevented from penetrating into the deeper part of the lower mantle by the high viscosities encountered at a depth of ~1000 km, referred to as the "viscosity hill", that cause stagnation at this depth as observed by seismic tomography.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)352-357
Number of pages6
JournalEarth and Planetary Science Letters
Volume403
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1 2014

Fingerprint

periclase
Silicates
lower mantle
perovskite
slab
Earth mantle
slabs
Viscosity
silicates
viscosity
silicate
electrical conductivity
Rocks
electrical resistivity
rocks
ringwoodite
mantle
seismic tomography
geological time
Tomography

Keywords

  • Connectivity
  • Ferro-periclase
  • Subducting slab
  • Viscosity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geochemistry and Petrology
  • Geophysics
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Space and Planetary Science

Cite this

Interconnection of ferro-periclase controls subducted slab morphology at the top of the lower mantle. / Yamazaki, Daisuke; Yoshino, Takashi; Nakakuki, Tomoeki.

In: Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 403, 01.10.2014, p. 352-357.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{99266bb629d7457dbce379d41f03531c,
title = "Interconnection of ferro-periclase controls subducted slab morphology at the top of the lower mantle",
abstract = "The electrical conductivity of mantle rocks during phase transformation from ringwoodite to silicate perovskite and ferro-periclase was measured at 25 GPa and various temperatures ranging from 1300 to 1900 K. The electrical conductivity was high at the initial stage of annealing, suggesting that ferro-periclase forms interconnected layers in aggregates of silicate perovskite and ferro-periclase that are representative of lower mantle rock. At 1900 K the electrical conductivity quickly decreased and reached that of silicate perovskite, suggesting the cut-off of the interconnected ferro-periclase because of rounding of crystals. Below 1700 K, the high conductivity values were maintained for experimental duration. The interconnection of ferro-periclase, which has a lower viscosity than silicate perovskite, can be maintained in a cold descending slab over geological time scales (~1 My), indicating that a colder slab is less viscous than the warmer mantle surrounding it. The low-viscosity slab can be prevented from penetrating into the deeper part of the lower mantle by the high viscosities encountered at a depth of ~1000 km, referred to as the {"}viscosity hill{"}, that cause stagnation at this depth as observed by seismic tomography.",
keywords = "Connectivity, Ferro-periclase, Subducting slab, Viscosity",
author = "Daisuke Yamazaki and Takashi Yoshino and Tomoeki Nakakuki",
year = "2014",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.epsl.2014.07.017",
language = "English",
volume = "403",
pages = "352--357",
journal = "Earth and Planetary Sciences Letters",
issn = "0012-821X",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Interconnection of ferro-periclase controls subducted slab morphology at the top of the lower mantle

AU - Yamazaki, Daisuke

AU - Yoshino, Takashi

AU - Nakakuki, Tomoeki

PY - 2014/10/1

Y1 - 2014/10/1

N2 - The electrical conductivity of mantle rocks during phase transformation from ringwoodite to silicate perovskite and ferro-periclase was measured at 25 GPa and various temperatures ranging from 1300 to 1900 K. The electrical conductivity was high at the initial stage of annealing, suggesting that ferro-periclase forms interconnected layers in aggregates of silicate perovskite and ferro-periclase that are representative of lower mantle rock. At 1900 K the electrical conductivity quickly decreased and reached that of silicate perovskite, suggesting the cut-off of the interconnected ferro-periclase because of rounding of crystals. Below 1700 K, the high conductivity values were maintained for experimental duration. The interconnection of ferro-periclase, which has a lower viscosity than silicate perovskite, can be maintained in a cold descending slab over geological time scales (~1 My), indicating that a colder slab is less viscous than the warmer mantle surrounding it. The low-viscosity slab can be prevented from penetrating into the deeper part of the lower mantle by the high viscosities encountered at a depth of ~1000 km, referred to as the "viscosity hill", that cause stagnation at this depth as observed by seismic tomography.

AB - The electrical conductivity of mantle rocks during phase transformation from ringwoodite to silicate perovskite and ferro-periclase was measured at 25 GPa and various temperatures ranging from 1300 to 1900 K. The electrical conductivity was high at the initial stage of annealing, suggesting that ferro-periclase forms interconnected layers in aggregates of silicate perovskite and ferro-periclase that are representative of lower mantle rock. At 1900 K the electrical conductivity quickly decreased and reached that of silicate perovskite, suggesting the cut-off of the interconnected ferro-periclase because of rounding of crystals. Below 1700 K, the high conductivity values were maintained for experimental duration. The interconnection of ferro-periclase, which has a lower viscosity than silicate perovskite, can be maintained in a cold descending slab over geological time scales (~1 My), indicating that a colder slab is less viscous than the warmer mantle surrounding it. The low-viscosity slab can be prevented from penetrating into the deeper part of the lower mantle by the high viscosities encountered at a depth of ~1000 km, referred to as the "viscosity hill", that cause stagnation at this depth as observed by seismic tomography.

KW - Connectivity

KW - Ferro-periclase

KW - Subducting slab

KW - Viscosity

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84905248662&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84905248662&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.epsl.2014.07.017

DO - 10.1016/j.epsl.2014.07.017

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84905248662

VL - 403

SP - 352

EP - 357

JO - Earth and Planetary Sciences Letters

JF - Earth and Planetary Sciences Letters

SN - 0012-821X

ER -