Interaction forces between thermoresponsive surface and colloidal particle in aqueous solution studied using atomic force microscopy

Naoyuki Ishida, Mikio Kobayashi

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The interaction forces between poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm)-grafted surfaces and colloidal particles in an aqueous solution were investigated using an atomic force microscope (AFM). Measurements were conducted between a smooth silicon wafer on which PNIPAAm was terminally grafted and silica particles hydrophobized with a silanating reagent in an aqueous electrolyte solution under controlled temperature. Below the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of PNIPAAm, there were large repulsive forces between the surfaces, while attractive forces were observed above LCST. When surface hydrophobicity of the particles increased, the magnitude of attractive force tended to increase. The changes of hydration state of the grafted PNIPAAm chains depending on temperature is considered to greatly alter the interaction force properties. The role of the intermolecular interaction between the PNIPAAm chains and the hydrophobic particles in the interaction forces is discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationColloidal Materials
Subtitle of host publicationSynthesis, Structure, and Applications
PublisherMaterials Research Society
Pages21-27
Number of pages7
ISBN (Print)1558998993, 9781558998995
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006
Externally publishedYes
Event2006 MRS Spring Meeting - San Francisco, CA, United States
Duration: Apr 17 2006Apr 21 2006

Publication series

NameMaterials Research Society Symposium Proceedings
Volume942
ISSN (Print)0272-9172

Other

Other2006 MRS Spring Meeting
CountryUnited States
CitySan Francisco, CA
Period4/17/064/21/06

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering

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