Influences of anthropogenic disturbances on the dynamics of white birch (Betula platyphylla) forests at the southern boundary of the Mongolian forest-steppe

Takashi Otoda, Keiji Sakamoto, Muneto Hirobe, Jamsran Undarmaa, Ken Yoshikawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We investigated the effects of disturbances on the dynamics of white birch-dominated forests at the southern boundary of the Mongolian forest-steppe. Dendroecological techniques were used to assess regeneration patterns and recent mortality trends in three stands with no evidence of recent anthropogenic disturbance (undisturbed) and four stands with evidence of cutting or fire (disturbed). In the undisturbed stands, only one distinct stem establishment was observed in the period between 1910 and 1950, and no establishment has been observed since then. In the disturbed stands, however, high establishment mainly by sprouting was observed in the period between 1960 and 1980. Percentages of standing dead stems were higher in the undisturbed stands than in the disturbed stands. Mean ages at death in the undisturbed stands were ≥70 years old. The high mortality was likely induced by the death of smaller stems due to light competition, whereas the mortality of larger stems was likely the result of tree senescence. In summary, the undisturbed stands seem to be in danger of decline due to a lack of regeneration during the last half of the previous century and recent high mortality rates of older stems, while the disturbed stands may be maintained for the next several decades by the younger cohort established between 1960 and 1980. White birch-dominated forests at the southern boundary of Mongolian forest-steppe have probably relied on relatively short disturbance intervals in the past because of the disturbance-dependent regeneration trait and relatively short longevity of Betula species.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)82-92
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Forest Research
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Fingerprint

forest-steppe
steppes
Betula
anthropogenic activities
stem
disturbance
stems
mortality
regeneration
death
senescence
sprouting

Keywords

  • Cutting
  • Dendroecology
  • Fire
  • Seedling regeneration
  • Sprouting

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Forestry

Cite this

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title = "Influences of anthropogenic disturbances on the dynamics of white birch (Betula platyphylla) forests at the southern boundary of the Mongolian forest-steppe",
abstract = "We investigated the effects of disturbances on the dynamics of white birch-dominated forests at the southern boundary of the Mongolian forest-steppe. Dendroecological techniques were used to assess regeneration patterns and recent mortality trends in three stands with no evidence of recent anthropogenic disturbance (undisturbed) and four stands with evidence of cutting or fire (disturbed). In the undisturbed stands, only one distinct stem establishment was observed in the period between 1910 and 1950, and no establishment has been observed since then. In the disturbed stands, however, high establishment mainly by sprouting was observed in the period between 1960 and 1980. Percentages of standing dead stems were higher in the undisturbed stands than in the disturbed stands. Mean ages at death in the undisturbed stands were ≥70 years old. The high mortality was likely induced by the death of smaller stems due to light competition, whereas the mortality of larger stems was likely the result of tree senescence. In summary, the undisturbed stands seem to be in danger of decline due to a lack of regeneration during the last half of the previous century and recent high mortality rates of older stems, while the disturbed stands may be maintained for the next several decades by the younger cohort established between 1960 and 1980. White birch-dominated forests at the southern boundary of Mongolian forest-steppe have probably relied on relatively short disturbance intervals in the past because of the disturbance-dependent regeneration trait and relatively short longevity of Betula species.",
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AU - Sakamoto, Keiji

AU - Hirobe, Muneto

AU - Undarmaa, Jamsran

AU - Yoshikawa, Ken

PY - 2013

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N2 - We investigated the effects of disturbances on the dynamics of white birch-dominated forests at the southern boundary of the Mongolian forest-steppe. Dendroecological techniques were used to assess regeneration patterns and recent mortality trends in three stands with no evidence of recent anthropogenic disturbance (undisturbed) and four stands with evidence of cutting or fire (disturbed). In the undisturbed stands, only one distinct stem establishment was observed in the period between 1910 and 1950, and no establishment has been observed since then. In the disturbed stands, however, high establishment mainly by sprouting was observed in the period between 1960 and 1980. Percentages of standing dead stems were higher in the undisturbed stands than in the disturbed stands. Mean ages at death in the undisturbed stands were ≥70 years old. The high mortality was likely induced by the death of smaller stems due to light competition, whereas the mortality of larger stems was likely the result of tree senescence. In summary, the undisturbed stands seem to be in danger of decline due to a lack of regeneration during the last half of the previous century and recent high mortality rates of older stems, while the disturbed stands may be maintained for the next several decades by the younger cohort established between 1960 and 1980. White birch-dominated forests at the southern boundary of Mongolian forest-steppe have probably relied on relatively short disturbance intervals in the past because of the disturbance-dependent regeneration trait and relatively short longevity of Betula species.

AB - We investigated the effects of disturbances on the dynamics of white birch-dominated forests at the southern boundary of the Mongolian forest-steppe. Dendroecological techniques were used to assess regeneration patterns and recent mortality trends in three stands with no evidence of recent anthropogenic disturbance (undisturbed) and four stands with evidence of cutting or fire (disturbed). In the undisturbed stands, only one distinct stem establishment was observed in the period between 1910 and 1950, and no establishment has been observed since then. In the disturbed stands, however, high establishment mainly by sprouting was observed in the period between 1960 and 1980. Percentages of standing dead stems were higher in the undisturbed stands than in the disturbed stands. Mean ages at death in the undisturbed stands were ≥70 years old. The high mortality was likely induced by the death of smaller stems due to light competition, whereas the mortality of larger stems was likely the result of tree senescence. In summary, the undisturbed stands seem to be in danger of decline due to a lack of regeneration during the last half of the previous century and recent high mortality rates of older stems, while the disturbed stands may be maintained for the next several decades by the younger cohort established between 1960 and 1980. White birch-dominated forests at the southern boundary of Mongolian forest-steppe have probably relied on relatively short disturbance intervals in the past because of the disturbance-dependent regeneration trait and relatively short longevity of Betula species.

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