Influence of sugar surfactant structure on the encapsulation of oil droplets in an amorphous sugar matrix during freeze-drying

Shota Nakayama, Yoshifumi Kimura, Sayuri Miki, Jun Oshitani, Takashi Kobayashi, Shuji Adachi, Tsutashi Matsuura, Hiroyuki Imanaka, Naoyuki Ishida, Hiroko Tada, Kazuhiro Nakanishi, Koreyoshi Imamura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The encapsulation of O/W emulsion droplets in a freeze-dried amorphous sugar matrix was investigated, focusing on the impact of the molecular structure of the emulsifying surfactant. O/W emulsions, containing various surfactants, were freeze-dried in the presence of a sugar. Thirty types of surfactants, including eighteen different sugar surfactants and ten types of commercially available sugar ester mixtures, were used. Linoleic acid methyl ester and trehalose were used as the oil phase and sugar. The amounts of oil droplets encapsulated in freeze-dried amorphous sugar matrix were analyzed by Fourier transform Infrared spectroscopy. Sugar surfactants were generally superior to the other classes of surfactants for oil droplet encapsulation during freeze-drying, and there was the optimum alkyl chain length of the sugar surfactant. Sugar esters generally exhibited greater oil encapsulation than sugar ethers. Larger sugar head group appeared to result in better encapsulation in the case of sugar esters, but the opposite tendency was found for sugar ethers. A limited combination of sugar surfactants (15% sucrose mono- and 85% di-stearate) resulted in the maximum oil droplet encapsulation efficiency although these surfactants are individually quite poor in the encapsulation and other tested combinations did not improve the encapsulation efficiency relative to their individual effectiveness.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)143-149
Number of pages7
JournalFood Research International
Volume70
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1 2015

Fingerprint

Freeze Drying
freeze drying
encapsulation
Surface-Active Agents
surfactants
droplets
Oils
sugars
oils
Esters
Ethers
Emulsions
esters
Stearates
Trehalose
emulsions
ethers
Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy
Molecular Structure
Sucrose

Keywords

  • Encapsulation efficiency
  • Lyophilization
  • Mixed emulsifier
  • O/W emulsion
  • Sugar ester

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science

Cite this

Influence of sugar surfactant structure on the encapsulation of oil droplets in an amorphous sugar matrix during freeze-drying. / Nakayama, Shota; Kimura, Yoshifumi; Miki, Sayuri; Oshitani, Jun; Kobayashi, Takashi; Adachi, Shuji; Matsuura, Tsutashi; Imanaka, Hiroyuki; Ishida, Naoyuki; Tada, Hiroko; Nakanishi, Kazuhiro; Imamura, Koreyoshi.

In: Food Research International, Vol. 70, 01.04.2015, p. 143-149.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nakayama, Shota ; Kimura, Yoshifumi ; Miki, Sayuri ; Oshitani, Jun ; Kobayashi, Takashi ; Adachi, Shuji ; Matsuura, Tsutashi ; Imanaka, Hiroyuki ; Ishida, Naoyuki ; Tada, Hiroko ; Nakanishi, Kazuhiro ; Imamura, Koreyoshi. / Influence of sugar surfactant structure on the encapsulation of oil droplets in an amorphous sugar matrix during freeze-drying. In: Food Research International. 2015 ; Vol. 70. pp. 143-149.
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