Influence of fish skin gelatin–sodium alginate complex stabilized emulsion on benzyl isothiocyanate stability and digestibility in vitro and in vivo

Xiangyu Zhang, Zhiyu Liu, Ailin Wang, Simin Zhang, Yoshimasa Nakamura, Songyi Lin, Yue Tang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: An emulsion delivery system for benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC) was prepared using fish skin gelatin (FSG) and sodium alginate (Alg). The effects of the FSG–Alg complex on the emulsion stability and BITC release pattern from the emulsion were investigated in vitro and in vivo. RESULTS: The storage stability and embedding rate of the 10 g kg−1 FSG and 2.5 g kg−1 Alg (FSG–Alg) emulsion were the highest among all samples. The FSG–Alg complex provided BITC a better protection during in vitro digestion. The microstructure of the FSG–Alg emulsions was more stable during in vitro digestion, and the bioaccessibility and retention rate of BITC were much higher compared to those of the FSG emulsion. The results of the ex vivo everted gut sac of rat intestine study showed that the FSG–Alg emulsion significantly increased the BITC absorption rate in the duodenum. CONCLUSION: The FSG–Alg emulsion delivery system is a highly stable system for the delivery of BITC that improves the bioaccessibility of BITC and promotes its absorption in the duodenum.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of the Science of Food and Agriculture
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • benzyl isothiocyanate
  • ex vivo everted gut sac of rat intestine study
  • fish skin gelatin
  • in vitro digestion
  • sodium alginate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Food Science
  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Influence of fish skin gelatin–sodium alginate complex stabilized emulsion on benzyl isothiocyanate stability and digestibility in vitro and in vivo'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this