Influence of artificial selection for duration of death feigning on pre- and post-copulatory traits in male Tribolium castaneum

Kentarou Matsumura, Takahisa Miyatake

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In many animals, investment in anti-predator traits can affect reproductive success. Conversely, males that invest more resources in mating success may have relatively fewer resources to devote to anti-predator traits, leading to increased predation risk. Although previous studies have reported a trade-off in investment between anti-predator traits and reproductive traits in male animals, few studies have specifically investigated the effects of anti-predator behavior on male reproductive traits. Many animals engage in death-feigning as an anti-predator behavior. Herein, we investigated the relationship between the death-feigning behavior and pre- and post-copulatory reproductive traits of male red flour beetles, Tribolium castaneum. In a previous study, we used artificial selection to establish T. castaneum strains with a genetically longer (L-strain) or shorter (S-strain) duration of death-feigning behavior. In the present study, we compared the attractiveness (a pre-copulatory trait) and paternity success (a post-copulatory trait) between L- and S-strain males. The results showed no significant difference in attractiveness or paternity success between the two strains. The results suggest that death-feigning behavior is not correlated with pre- or post-copulatory reproductive traits in male T. castaneum.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Ethology
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

artificial selection
Tribolium castaneum
reproductive traits
death
duration
predator
predators
paternity
animal
mating success
predation risk
resource
trade-off
reproductive success
beetle
animals
predation

Keywords

  • Anti-predator trait
  • Attractiveness
  • Mating success
  • Paternity success
  • Reproduction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Animal Science and Zoology

Cite this

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abstract = "In many animals, investment in anti-predator traits can affect reproductive success. Conversely, males that invest more resources in mating success may have relatively fewer resources to devote to anti-predator traits, leading to increased predation risk. Although previous studies have reported a trade-off in investment between anti-predator traits and reproductive traits in male animals, few studies have specifically investigated the effects of anti-predator behavior on male reproductive traits. Many animals engage in death-feigning as an anti-predator behavior. Herein, we investigated the relationship between the death-feigning behavior and pre- and post-copulatory reproductive traits of male red flour beetles, Tribolium castaneum. In a previous study, we used artificial selection to establish T. castaneum strains with a genetically longer (L-strain) or shorter (S-strain) duration of death-feigning behavior. In the present study, we compared the attractiveness (a pre-copulatory trait) and paternity success (a post-copulatory trait) between L- and S-strain males. The results showed no significant difference in attractiveness or paternity success between the two strains. The results suggest that death-feigning behavior is not correlated with pre- or post-copulatory reproductive traits in male T. castaneum.",
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