Induction and prevention of virus-associated malignant lymphoma by serial transmission of EBV-related virus from cynomolgus by blood transfusion in rabbits

Tirtha Raj Koirala, Kazuhiko Hayashi, Zaishun Jin, Sachiyo Onoda, Takehiro Tanaka, Wakako Oda, Koichi Ichimura, Nobuya Ohara, Takashi Oka, Masao Yamada, Tadashi Yoshino

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-related herpesvirus (Si-IIA-EBV) was serially transmitted for 3 passages from rabbit to rabbit of the opposite sex by blood transfusion, which subsequently induced virus-associated rabbit lymphomas. The virus could be transmitted by transfusion with 15-20 ml of whole blood (7/7) or irradiated blood (1/6) from the EBV-related virus-infected rabbits, but there was no transmission with transfusion of cell-free plasma (0/6) from the infected rabbits. Passive anti-EBV-VCA IgG (x 20-x 10) titers decreased during the first 1-2 weeks in the transfused rabbits. The virus-transmitted rabbits showed a gradual increase in antibody titers ranging from peak titers of x 640 to x 2560 after 3 weeks of transfusion. The recipient origin of malignant lymphoma that developed in the first rabbit transfused by infected blood was confirmed by chromosomal analysis. This rabbit model thus shows that EBV-related herpesvirus is serially transmissible by blood transfusion and that transmission can not be completely prevented by irradiation of blood, but removal of blood cells is the best way to prevent transmission of EBV-related virus. Therefore, this animal model provides a convenient in vivo system for studies of the prevention and therapy of transfusion-related transmission of EBV and EBV-associated lymphoproliferative diseases in immunocompromised human beings.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)67-74
Number of pages8
JournalActa medica Okayama
Volume58
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1 2004

Keywords

  • Blood transfusion
  • Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)
  • Lymphoproliferative diseases
  • Rabbit

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

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