Increased adhesion of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus to the surface of personal protective clothing damaged by friction during nursing action

Fuminori Tanabe, Yukiko Uchida, Soichi Arakawa, Michiko Morimoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Health care workers wear protective clothing when caring for patients with infectious diseases. However, during the action of patient care, the generated contact pressure may damage the surface of the protective clothing. Methods: Fabrics of protective clothing were damaged by a machine using a force similar to the contact pressure that occurs during nursing care. A total of 50 μL of blood containing methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (5 × 106 colony-forming units/mL) was dropped onto the pressed or rubbed fabrics. After removing the blood, the residual bacterial count on the surface of the clothing was measured. Results: In the undamaged fabrics, the number of adherent MRSA was significantly higher on class 6 protective clothing than on the other tested clothing. The number of adherent MRSA significantly increased on the rubbed surgical gown and rubbed class 3 protective clothing than on the undamaged clothing. Conclusions: Because the damaged fabrics of protective clothing may cause bacterial carryover, health care workers should pay attention to preventing self-contamination when doffing the protective clothing.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)416-419
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Infection Control
Volume48
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Bacterial carryover
  • Fabric
  • Infection
  • Personal protective equipment
  • Self-contamination

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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