In vivo evaluation of bone-bonding of titanium metal chemically treated with a hydrogen peroxide solution containing tantalum chloride

S. Kaneko, K. Tsuru, Satoshi Hayakawa, S. Takemoto, C. Ohtsuki, Toshihumi Ozaki, H. Inoue, A. Osaka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

69 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Apatite formation on implants is important in achieving a direct bonding to bone tissue. We recently showed that titanium metal chemically treated with a hydrogen peroxide solution containing tantalum chloride has the ability to form a hydroxyapatite layer in simulated body fluid which had inorganic ion composition similar to human blood plasma. In this study, a pure titanium cylinder (4.0mm in diameter, 20.0mm in length) treated with this method was implanted into a hole (4.2mm in diameter) in a rabbit's tibia. After implantation for predetermined periods up to 16 weeks, the specimens were extracted with bone tissue, and were examined by push-out test to evaluate the shearing force between the implant and bone tissue. The results were compared with those of non-treated pure titanium. Eight weeks after surgery, the shearing force of the treated titanium implanted in the 4.2mm-hole was significantly higher than that of non-treated titanium, although the surface roughness was not changed after the treatment. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) observation and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) microanalysis showed that the bone comes very close to the surface of the treated titanium. Moreover, the shearing force was higher for the implanted sample in the 4.0mm-hole than that in the 4.2mm-hole. Thus, it is confirmed that the treatment with hydrogen peroxide solution containing tantalum chloride provides higher bonding ability on titanium implants in vivo.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)875-881
Number of pages7
JournalBiomaterials
Volume22
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 1 2001

Fingerprint

Tantalum
Titanium
Hydrogen peroxide
Hydrogen Peroxide
Bone
Metals
Bone and Bones
Shearing
Tissue
Electron Probe Microanalysis
Apatites
Body fluids
Apatite
Microanalysis
Body Fluids
Durapatite
tantalum chloride
Tibia
Hydroxyapatite
Surgery

Keywords

  • Bioactivity
  • Bone-bonding
  • In vivo study
  • Surface treatment
  • Titanium

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Bioengineering
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

In vivo evaluation of bone-bonding of titanium metal chemically treated with a hydrogen peroxide solution containing tantalum chloride. / Kaneko, S.; Tsuru, K.; Hayakawa, Satoshi; Takemoto, S.; Ohtsuki, C.; Ozaki, Toshihumi; Inoue, H.; Osaka, A.

In: Biomaterials, Vol. 22, No. 9, 01.05.2001, p. 875-881.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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