In vivo EPR detection and imaging of endogenous nitric oxide in lipopolysaccharide-treated mice

Tetsuhiko Yoshimura, Hidekatsu Yokoyama, Satoshi Fujii, Fusako Takayama, Kazuo Oikawa, Hitoshi Kamada

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

196 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nitric oxide (NO), a simple diatomic free radical, is known to play a critical physiological role in diverse organisms. An iron complex, with N- (dithiocarboxy)sarcosine (Fe-DTCS), has a high affinity for endogenous NO and can trap, stabilize, and accumulate it. The stable NO adduct thus formed is detectable at room temperature with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometry. We report in vivo EPR imaging of endogenous NO, trapped by an Fe-DTCS complex, in the abdomen of a live mouse. To our knowledge, this is the first report on EPR imaging of endogenous free radicals produced in vivo. This EPR imaging method will be useful for the noninvasive investigation of the spatial distribution of NO in pathologic organs or tissues.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)992-994
Number of pages3
JournalNature Biotechnology
Volume14
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 1996

Keywords

  • EPR imaging
  • N- (dithiocarboxy)sarcosine
  • lipopolysaccharide
  • nitric oxide
  • spin-trapping

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Bioengineering
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Biomedical Engineering

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