In silico simulation modeling reveals the importance of the casparian strip for efficient silicon uptake in rice roots

Gen Sakurai, Akiko Satake, Naoki Yamaji, Namiki Mitani, Masayuki Yokozawa, François Gabriel Feugier, Jian Feng Ma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Silicon (Si) uptake by the roots is mediated by two different transporters, Lsi1 (passive) and Lsi2 (active), in rice (Oryza sativa). Both transporters are polarly localized in the plasma membranes of exodermal (outer) and endodermal (inner) cells with Casparian strips. However, it is unknown how rice is able to take up large amounts of Si compared with other plants, and why rice Si transporters have a characteristic cellular localization pattern. To answer these questions, we simulated Si uptake by rice roots by developing a mathematical model based on a simple diffusion equation that also accounts for active transport by Lsi2. In this model, we calibrated the model parameters using in vivo experimental data on the Si concentrations in the xylem sap and a Monte Carlo method. In our simulation experiments, we compared the Si uptake between roots with various transporter and Casparian strip locations and estimated the Si transport efficiency of roots with different localization patterns and quantities of the Lsi transporters. We found that the Si uptake by roots that lacked Casparian strips was lower than that of normal roots. This suggests that the doublelayer structure of the Casparian strips is an important factor in the high Si uptake by rice. We also found that among various possible localization patterns, the most efficient one was that of the wild-type rice; this may explain the high Si uptake capacity of rice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)631-639
Number of pages9
JournalPlant and Cell Physiology
Volume56
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Silicon
silicon
Computer Simulation
uptake mechanisms
rice
transporters
Oryza
Monte Carlo Method
Xylem
Monte Carlo method
active transport
Active Biological Transport
sap
xylem
Oryza sativa
Theoretical Models
mathematical models
plasma membrane
Cell Membrane

Keywords

  • Casparian strip
  • Nutrient uptake
  • Polar localization
  • Rice
  • Si
  • Transporters

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Plant Science
  • Physiology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

In silico simulation modeling reveals the importance of the casparian strip for efficient silicon uptake in rice roots. / Sakurai, Gen; Satake, Akiko; Yamaji, Naoki; Mitani, Namiki; Yokozawa, Masayuki; Feugier, François Gabriel; Ma, Jian Feng.

In: Plant and Cell Physiology, Vol. 56, No. 4, 2015, p. 631-639.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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