Importance and usefulness of evaluating self-esteem in children

Mizuho Hosogi, Ayumi Okada, Chikako Fujii, Keizou Noguchi, Kumi Watanabe

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Self-esteem is the "feeling of self-appreciation" and is an indispensable emotion for people to adapt to society and live their lives. For children, in particular, the environment in which they are raised contributes profoundly to the development of their self-esteem, which in turn helps them to adapt better to society. Various psychologists have provided definitions of self-esteem, and examined methods of objectively evaluating self-esteem. Questionnaire-style assessment methods for adult include Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and Janis-Field Feeling of Inadequacy Scale, and these for children include Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory, Pope's 5-Scale Test of Self-Esteem for children, and Kid- KINDL ®. Other methods include Ziller Social Self-Esteem Scale and Implicit Association Test. The development of children's self-esteem is heavily influenced by their environment, that is, their homes, neighborhoods, and schools. Children with damaged self-esteem are at risk of developing psychological and social problems, which hinders recovery from low self-esteem. Thus, to recover low self-esteem, it is important for children to accumulate a series of successful experiences to create a positive concept of self. Evaluating children's self-esteem can be an effective method for understanding their past and present circumstances, and useful to treat for children with psychosomatic disorders.

Original languageEnglish
Article number9
JournalBioPsychoSocial Medicine
Volume6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 20 2012

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Keywords

  • Mental health
  • Pope's 5-scale test of self-esteem for children
  • Psychosomatic disorder
  • Quality of life
  • Self-esteem

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Psychology(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

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