Immunohistochemical detection of mutant p53 protein in small-cell lung cancer: Relationship to treatment outcome

Kenichi Gemba, Hiroshi Ueoka, Katsuyuki Kiura, Masahiro Tabata, Mine Harada

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We investigated the expression of mutant p53 proteins in small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) immunohistochemically, by identification of stabilized mutant p53 proteins with a much longer half-life than the wild-type protein. Of 103 tumor specimens obtained by transbronchial tumor biopsy for histologic diagnosis, 52 (50%) showed positive staining for p53 protein with a p53 monoclonal antibody, DO-1. Positive staining for p53 protein was not correlated with age, sex, performance status, lifetime cigarette consumption, serum concentration of neuron-specific enolase and extent of disease. Complete response rates in patients with a mutant p53 protein-positive tumor were significantly lower than those in p53-negative patients (25% versus 59%; P=0.0005, by chi-square test). Similarly, survival periods in patients with a mutant p53 protein-positive tumor were significantly shorter than those in mutant p53-protein-negative patients (10.8 months versus 20.6 months; P=0.0001, by generalized Wilcoxon test). Multivariate analysis using Cox's proportional hazards model revealed that the presence of mutant p53 protein is an independent factor associated with differences in overall survival (hazards ratio=2.72; 95% confidence interval, 1.71-4.34; P=0.0001). These observations suggest that the expression of mutant p53 proteins in SCLC may be an important factor predicting poor prognosis. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)23-31
Number of pages9
JournalLung Cancer
Volume29
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2000

Keywords

  • Chemotherapy
  • Immunohistochemistry
  • Lung cancer
  • Mutant p53 protein
  • Prognostic factor
  • Small-cell lung cancer
  • p53 Gene

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cancer Research

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