Immunogenicity of an inflammation-associated product, tyrosine nitrated self-proteins

Hitoshi Ohmori, Naoki Kanayama

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

63 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To understand the mechanism leading to autoantibody production, it is of importance to reveal how self-components that are otherwise inactive as antigens acquire immunogenicity. One possible mechanism is the generation of structurally modified self-proteins in apoptotic or inflamed tissues. The post-translational modification of proteins might give rise to the generation of new epitopes to which T and B lymphocytes are not rendered tolerant. Among the protein modifications, this review is focussed on the generation and the immunogenicity of self-proteins carrying 3-nitrotyrosine (NT), an inflammation-associated marker. NT-proteins are generated in vivo by nitration with peroxynitrite, which is formed from nitric oxide and superoxide that are released from activated inflammatory cells. Interestingly, many anti-DNA Abs from autoimmune mice have been shown cross-reactive with NT. Analysis of the immunogenicity of NT-carrying self-proteins has revealed that they elicit both humoral and cellular immune responses in mice. Thus, NT-containing epitopes created on self-proteins may serve as a trigger to impair or bypass immunological tolerance.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)224-229
Number of pages6
JournalAutoimmunity Reviews
Volume4
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2005

Fingerprint

Tyrosine
Inflammation
Proteins
Epitopes
Peroxynitrous Acid
Post Translational Protein Processing
Humoral Immunity
Cellular Immunity
Superoxides
Autoantibodies
Nitric Oxide
B-Lymphocytes
3-nitrotyrosine
T-Lymphocytes
Antigens
DNA

Keywords

  • Anti-DNA antibody
  • Autoantibody
  • Peroxynitrite
  • Post-translational modification
  • Protein tyrosine nitration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

Immunogenicity of an inflammation-associated product, tyrosine nitrated self-proteins. / Ohmori, Hitoshi; Kanayama, Naoki.

In: Autoimmunity Reviews, Vol. 4, No. 4, 04.2005, p. 224-229.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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