Immobilization stress induces elevation of intraocular pressure in rabbits

Yoshinori Miyazaki, Toshihiko Matsuo, Yuzuru Kurabayashi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of this study was to test whether immobilization and intravenous volume load as stressors influence the intraocular pressure in rabbits. Rabbits were immobilized for 1 h in a horizontally placed plastic tube with an internal diameter of 13.2 cm and a length of 33.2 cm. After immobilization, rabbits received rapid intravenous drip infusion of 5% glucose solution, 20 ml/kg of body weight, in 5 min. The intraocular pressure immediately after immobilization (11.2 ± 3.0 mm Hg; mean and standard deviation) was significantly higher compared to control rabbits without immobilization (9.2 ± 1.0 mm Hg, Student's t test, p = 0.0462). This difference became significantly larger when volume load was exerted on both groups of rabbits (22.7 ± 5.6 versus 16.4 ± 2.2 mm Hg, p = 0.0067). Serum levels of cortisol, adrenaline, and noradrenaline were significantly elevated after immobilization (p = 0.0002, p = 0.0271, p = 0.0296, respectively). Venous pressure of the ear tended to increase in rabbits immediately after immobilization (15.8 ± 3.1 mm Hg) compared with control rabbits (8.5 ± 2.3 mm Hg), and the difference became significant when volume load was exerted on both groups of rabbits (20.8 ± 7.4 versus 9.2 ± 4.8 mm Hg, p = 0.0211). In conclusion, we clearly demonstrated that physical stress due to immobilization, especially in combination with volume load, increased intraocular pressure in rabbits. Copyright (C) 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)270-277
Number of pages8
JournalOphthalmic Research
Volume32
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2000

Fingerprint

Intraocular Pressure
Immobilization
Rabbits
Intravenous Infusions
Venous Pressure
Epinephrine
Plastics
Ear
Hydrocortisone
Norepinephrine
Body Weight
Students
Glucose
Serum

Keywords

  • Adrenaline
  • Cortisol
  • Immobilization stress
  • Intraocular pressure
  • Noradrenaline

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Immobilization stress induces elevation of intraocular pressure in rabbits. / Miyazaki, Yoshinori; Matsuo, Toshihiko; Kurabayashi, Yuzuru.

In: Ophthalmic Research, Vol. 32, No. 6, 11.2000, p. 270-277.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Miyazaki, Yoshinori ; Matsuo, Toshihiko ; Kurabayashi, Yuzuru. / Immobilization stress induces elevation of intraocular pressure in rabbits. In: Ophthalmic Research. 2000 ; Vol. 32, No. 6. pp. 270-277.
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