Ice nanotube: what does the unit cell look like?

Kenichiro Koga, Ruben D. Parra, Hideki Tanaka, X. C. Zeng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

71 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The unit cell structure and relative stability of ice nanotubes built from n-gonal rings of water were computationally studied. Four nanotubes were examined, referred to as square, pentagonal, hexagonal, and octagonal, depending on the number of stacked n-gons. The data obtained indicate that among these nanotubules, the pentagonal or hexagonal ice nanotube is the most stable.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5037-5040
Number of pages4
JournalThe Journal of Chemical Physics
Volume113
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 22 2000

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Ice
Nanotubes
nanotubes
ice
cells
Water
rings
water

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics

Cite this

Ice nanotube : what does the unit cell look like? / Koga, Kenichiro; Parra, Ruben D.; Tanaka, Hideki; Zeng, X. C.

In: The Journal of Chemical Physics, Vol. 113, No. 12, 22.09.2000, p. 5037-5040.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Koga, Kenichiro ; Parra, Ruben D. ; Tanaka, Hideki ; Zeng, X. C. / Ice nanotube : what does the unit cell look like?. In: The Journal of Chemical Physics. 2000 ; Vol. 113, No. 12. pp. 5037-5040.
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