Hydrogen therapy may reduce the risks related to radiation-induced oxidative stress in space flight

Michael P. Schoenfeld, Rafat R. Ansari, June F. Zakrajsek, Timothy R. Billiar, Yoshiya Toyoda, David A. Wink, Atsunori Nakao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cosmic radiation is known to induce DNA and lipid damage associated with increased oxidative stress and remains a major concern in space travel. Hydrogen, recently discovered as a novel therapeutic medical gas in a variety of biomedical fields, has potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. It is expected that space mission activities will increase in coming years both in numbers and duration. It is therefore important to estimate and prevent the risks encountered by astronauts due to oxidative stress prior to developing clinical symptoms of disease. We hypothesize that hydrogen administration to the astronauts by either inhalation or drinking hydrogen-rich water may potentially yield a novel and feasible preventative/therapeutic strategy to prevent radiation-induced adverse events.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)117-118
Number of pages2
JournalMedical Hypotheses
Volume76
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Space Flight
Astronauts
Hydrogen
Oxidative Stress
Radiation
Cosmic Radiation
Inhalation
Drinking
DNA Damage
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Therapeutics
Antioxidants
Gases
Lipids
Water

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Schoenfeld, M. P., Ansari, R. R., Zakrajsek, J. F., Billiar, T. R., Toyoda, Y., Wink, D. A., & Nakao, A. (2011). Hydrogen therapy may reduce the risks related to radiation-induced oxidative stress in space flight. Medical Hypotheses, 76(1), 117-118. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mehy.2010.08.046

Hydrogen therapy may reduce the risks related to radiation-induced oxidative stress in space flight. / Schoenfeld, Michael P.; Ansari, Rafat R.; Zakrajsek, June F.; Billiar, Timothy R.; Toyoda, Yoshiya; Wink, David A.; Nakao, Atsunori.

In: Medical Hypotheses, Vol. 76, No. 1, 01.2011, p. 117-118.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schoenfeld, MP, Ansari, RR, Zakrajsek, JF, Billiar, TR, Toyoda, Y, Wink, DA & Nakao, A 2011, 'Hydrogen therapy may reduce the risks related to radiation-induced oxidative stress in space flight', Medical Hypotheses, vol. 76, no. 1, pp. 117-118. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mehy.2010.08.046
Schoenfeld, Michael P. ; Ansari, Rafat R. ; Zakrajsek, June F. ; Billiar, Timothy R. ; Toyoda, Yoshiya ; Wink, David A. ; Nakao, Atsunori. / Hydrogen therapy may reduce the risks related to radiation-induced oxidative stress in space flight. In: Medical Hypotheses. 2011 ; Vol. 76, No. 1. pp. 117-118.
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