Human monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) Full-length cDNA cloning, expression in mitogen-stimulated blood mononuclear leukocytes, and sequence similarity to mouse competence gene JE

Teizo Yoshimura, Naoya Yuhki, Stephen K. Moore, Ettore Appella, Michael I. Lerman, Edward J. Leonard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

461 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this work was to analyze cDNA encoding human monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), previously isolated from glioma cell line culture fluid. Screening of a cDNA library from total poly(A) RNA of glioma cell line U-105MG yielded a clone that coded for the entire MCP-1. Nucleotide sequence analysis and comparison with the amino acid sequence of purified MCP-1 showed that the cDNA clone comprises a 53-nucleotide 5′-non-coding region, an open reading frame coding for a 99-residue protein of which the last 76 residues correspond exactly to pure MCP-1, and a 389-nucleotide 3′-untranslated region. The hydrophobicity of the first 23 residues is typical of a signal peptide. Southern blot analysis of human and animal genomic DNA showed that there is a single MCP-1 gene, which is conserved in several primates. MCP-1 mRNA was induced in human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes (PBMNLs) by PHA, LPS and IL-1, but not by IL-2, TNF, or IFN-γ. Among proteins with similar sequences, the coding regions of MCP-1 and mouse JE show 68% identity. This suggests that MCP-1 is the human homologue of the mouse competence gene JE.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)487-493
Number of pages7
JournalFEBS Letters
Volume244
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 27 1989
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Chemotaxis
  • Inflammation
  • Macrophage infiltration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Structural Biology
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Cell Biology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Human monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) Full-length cDNA cloning, expression in mitogen-stimulated blood mononuclear leukocytes, and sequence similarity to mouse competence gene JE'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this