Highly selective friedel-crafts reaction of electrochmemically generated "cation pool" using micromixing

Jun Ichi Yoshida, Aiichiro Nagaki, Seiji Suga

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

Highly selective Friedel-Crafts monoalkylation, which was intrinsically difficult to be achieved by conventional methods, has been accomplished by micromixing. N-Acyliminium ion generated by the "cation pool" method was used as an alkylating agent and 1,3,5-trimethoxybenzene was used as an aromatic compound. The reaction in a macro-scale batch reactor (magnetic stirring) gave rise to the formation of a mixture of the monoalkylation product and the dialkylation product in ca. 1:1 ratio, but the use of a multilamination-type micromixer led to selective monoalkylation (92% yield). Based on the micromixing, the selective sequential dialkylation using two different alkylating agents was achieved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages141-144
Number of pages4
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2004
Externally publishedYes
EventAnalytical, Mechanistic, and Synthetic Organic Electrochemistry - The Sixth International Manuel M. Baizer Symposium in Honor of Dennis H. Evans and Masao Tokuda - San Antonio, TX, United States
Duration: May 9 2004May 14 2004

Other

OtherAnalytical, Mechanistic, and Synthetic Organic Electrochemistry - The Sixth International Manuel M. Baizer Symposium in Honor of Dennis H. Evans and Masao Tokuda
CountryUnited States
CitySan Antonio, TX
Period5/9/045/14/04

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

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    Yoshida, J. I., Nagaki, A., & Suga, S. (2004). Highly selective friedel-crafts reaction of electrochmemically generated "cation pool" using micromixing. 141-144. Paper presented at Analytical, Mechanistic, and Synthetic Organic Electrochemistry - The Sixth International Manuel M. Baizer Symposium in Honor of Dennis H. Evans and Masao Tokuda, San Antonio, TX, United States.