Hepatitis B virus DNA in liver tissue and risk for hepatocarcinogenesis in patients with hepatitis C virus-related chronic liver disease: A prospective study

Mikako Obika, Toshiyuki Shinji, Shin Ichi Fujioka, Ryo Terada, Hiromasa Ryuko, Aye Aye Lwin, Hidenori Shiraha, Norio Koide

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims: To prospectively study whether occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection can promote the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related chronic liver disease. In addition, to evaluate the difference among HBV DNA-negative patients and patients with high and low HBV copy numbers. Methods: A total of 167 patients with HCV-related chronic liver disease without HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) were studied. HBV DNA in liver tissue was determined using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: HBV DNA was detected in 9 of 167 patients (5.4%) by single PCR and in 25 patients (15.0%) by nested PCR. HCC developed in 12 of 167 patients (7.2%). Ten of 142 HBV DNA-negative patients (7.0%) and 2 of 9 patients with a high HBV copy number (22.2%) developed HCC, whereas none of 16 patients with a low HBV copy number developed HCC. The incidence rate of HCC in patients with a high HBV copy number was significantly higher than in HBV DNA-negative patients and patients with low HBV copy number. Conclusion: A high amount of HBV DNA in liver tissue of HBsAg-negative patients with HCV-related liver disease might be associated with HCC development.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)59-68
Number of pages10
JournalIntervirology
Volume51
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2008

Keywords

  • Hepatitis B virus
  • Hepatitis B virus DNA
  • Hepatitis C virus
  • Hepatocarcinogenesis
  • Hepatocellular carcinoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Virology
  • Infectious Diseases

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