Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for natural killer-cell lineage neoplasms

R. Suzuki, J. Suzumiya, S. Nakamura, Y. Kagami, J. I. Kameoka, C. Sakai, H. Mukai, K. Takenaka, Tadashi Yoshino, T. Tsuzuki, H. Sugimori, K. Kawa, Y. Kodera, K. Oshimi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Neoplasms of natural killer (NK)-lineage are rare. Their prognosis is generally poor except for cases of solitary nasal NK-cell lymphoma. The NK-cell Tumor Study Group performed a survey in Japan on patients diagnosed between 1994 and 1998. Of 228 patients selected for analysis, 40 underwent HSCT (15 allografts and 25 autografts). The underlying diseases were myeloid/NK cell precursor acute leukemia (n = 4), blastic NK-cell lymphoma (n = 11), aggressive NK-cell leukemia (n = 3), and nasal-type extranodal NK-cell lymphoma (n = 22). At the time of HSCT, 22 patients were in complete remission (CR), 11 were in relapse, and seven were primary refractory. All patients received myeloablative conditioning regimens including total-body irradiation. Sixteen died of disease progression, and six of treatment-related causes. Overall, 4-year survival was 39% with a median follow-up of 50 months; this was significantly better than that of patients who did not undergo HSCT (21%, P = 0.0003). For patients transplanted in CR, the 4-year overall survival was 68%, which was significantly better than that of patients who went into CR but did not undergo HSCT (P = 0.03). These findings suggest that the HSCT is a promising treatment strategy for NK-cell lineage.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)425-431
Number of pages7
JournalBone Marrow Transplantation
Volume37
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2006

Fingerprint

Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation
Cell Lineage
Natural Killer Cells
Neoplasms
Lymphoma
Nose
Large Granular Lymphocytic Leukemia
Survival
Whole-Body Irradiation
Autografts
Allografts
Disease Progression
Japan
Leukemia
Recurrence
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation
  • Lymphoma
  • Natural killer cell

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Transplantation

Cite this

Suzuki, R., Suzumiya, J., Nakamura, S., Kagami, Y., Kameoka, J. I., Sakai, C., ... Oshimi, K. (2006). Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for natural killer-cell lineage neoplasms. Bone Marrow Transplantation, 37(4), 425-431. https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.bmt.1705244

Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for natural killer-cell lineage neoplasms. / Suzuki, R.; Suzumiya, J.; Nakamura, S.; Kagami, Y.; Kameoka, J. I.; Sakai, C.; Mukai, H.; Takenaka, K.; Yoshino, Tadashi; Tsuzuki, T.; Sugimori, H.; Kawa, K.; Kodera, Y.; Oshimi, K.

In: Bone Marrow Transplantation, Vol. 37, No. 4, 02.2006, p. 425-431.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Suzuki, R, Suzumiya, J, Nakamura, S, Kagami, Y, Kameoka, JI, Sakai, C, Mukai, H, Takenaka, K, Yoshino, T, Tsuzuki, T, Sugimori, H, Kawa, K, Kodera, Y & Oshimi, K 2006, 'Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for natural killer-cell lineage neoplasms', Bone Marrow Transplantation, vol. 37, no. 4, pp. 425-431. https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.bmt.1705244
Suzuki R, Suzumiya J, Nakamura S, Kagami Y, Kameoka JI, Sakai C et al. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for natural killer-cell lineage neoplasms. Bone Marrow Transplantation. 2006 Feb;37(4):425-431. https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.bmt.1705244
Suzuki, R. ; Suzumiya, J. ; Nakamura, S. ; Kagami, Y. ; Kameoka, J. I. ; Sakai, C. ; Mukai, H. ; Takenaka, K. ; Yoshino, Tadashi ; Tsuzuki, T. ; Sugimori, H. ; Kawa, K. ; Kodera, Y. ; Oshimi, K. / Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for natural killer-cell lineage neoplasms. In: Bone Marrow Transplantation. 2006 ; Vol. 37, No. 4. pp. 425-431.
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abstract = "Neoplasms of natural killer (NK)-lineage are rare. Their prognosis is generally poor except for cases of solitary nasal NK-cell lymphoma. The NK-cell Tumor Study Group performed a survey in Japan on patients diagnosed between 1994 and 1998. Of 228 patients selected for analysis, 40 underwent HSCT (15 allografts and 25 autografts). The underlying diseases were myeloid/NK cell precursor acute leukemia (n = 4), blastic NK-cell lymphoma (n = 11), aggressive NK-cell leukemia (n = 3), and nasal-type extranodal NK-cell lymphoma (n = 22). At the time of HSCT, 22 patients were in complete remission (CR), 11 were in relapse, and seven were primary refractory. All patients received myeloablative conditioning regimens including total-body irradiation. Sixteen died of disease progression, and six of treatment-related causes. Overall, 4-year survival was 39{\%} with a median follow-up of 50 months; this was significantly better than that of patients who did not undergo HSCT (21{\%}, P = 0.0003). For patients transplanted in CR, the 4-year overall survival was 68{\%}, which was significantly better than that of patients who went into CR but did not undergo HSCT (P = 0.03). These findings suggest that the HSCT is a promising treatment strategy for NK-cell lineage.",
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