Heart allograft protection with low-dose carbon monoxide inhalation

Effects on inflammatory mediators and alloreactive T-cell responses

Atsunori Nakao, Hideyoshi Toyokawa, Masanori Abe, Tetsuma Kiyomoto, Kiichi Nakahira, Augustine M K Choi, Michael A. Nalesnik, Angus W. Thomson, Noriko Murase

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

60 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Carbon monoxide (CO), a byproduct of heme catalysis, has lately received considerable attention as a regulatory molecule in cellular and biological processes. CO has been shown to provide potent protection against a variety of tissue injuries. We hypothesized in this study that low concentration CO would be beneficial for organ allografts, which frequently undergo several types of injury such as ischemia/reperfusion, alloimmune reaction, and inflammation Methods. The efficacy of low-dose CO was examined in a fully allogeneic LEW to BN rat heterotopic heart transplantation (HHTx) model. Recipients were kept in air or exposed to low-dose CO (20 ppm) for 14, 28, or 100 days after HHTx under short-course tacrolimus Results. CO treatment (d0-28, 0-100) was remarkably effective in prolonging heart allograft survival to a median of >100 from 45 days in the air-control group, with significant reductions of arteritis, fibrosis, and cellular infiltration, including macrophages and T cells. CO inhibited intragraft upregulation of Th1 type cytokines (IL-2, IFNγ), proinflammatory mediators (IL-1β, TNFα, IL-6, COX-2), and adhesion molecule. Shorter CO exposure in early (0-13d) and late (14-28d) posttransplant periods also prolonged graft survival, with a significant inhibition of inflammatory mediators Conclusions. These results show that low dose CO inhalation protects heart allografts and can considerably prolong their survival. CO appears to function via multiple mechanisms, including direct inhibition of Th1 type cytokine production and regulation of inflammatory responses.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)220-230
Number of pages11
JournalTransplantation
Volume81
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Carbon Monoxide
Inhalation
Allografts
T-Lymphocytes
Inbred BN Rats
Air
Heterotopic Transplantation
Cytokines
Biological Phenomena
Arteritis
Wounds and Injuries
Tacrolimus
Graft Survival
Heart Transplantation
Catalysis
Heme
Interleukin-1
Reperfusion
Interleukin-2
Interleukin-6

Keywords

  • Carbon monoxide
  • Chronic rejection
  • Heart transplantation
  • Heme oxygenase
  • Inflammation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation
  • Immunology

Cite this

Heart allograft protection with low-dose carbon monoxide inhalation : Effects on inflammatory mediators and alloreactive T-cell responses. / Nakao, Atsunori; Toyokawa, Hideyoshi; Abe, Masanori; Kiyomoto, Tetsuma; Nakahira, Kiichi; Choi, Augustine M K; Nalesnik, Michael A.; Thomson, Angus W.; Murase, Noriko.

In: Transplantation, Vol. 81, No. 2, 01.2006, p. 220-230.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nakao, A, Toyokawa, H, Abe, M, Kiyomoto, T, Nakahira, K, Choi, AMK, Nalesnik, MA, Thomson, AW & Murase, N 2006, 'Heart allograft protection with low-dose carbon monoxide inhalation: Effects on inflammatory mediators and alloreactive T-cell responses', Transplantation, vol. 81, no. 2, pp. 220-230. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.tp.0000188637.80695.7f
Nakao, Atsunori ; Toyokawa, Hideyoshi ; Abe, Masanori ; Kiyomoto, Tetsuma ; Nakahira, Kiichi ; Choi, Augustine M K ; Nalesnik, Michael A. ; Thomson, Angus W. ; Murase, Noriko. / Heart allograft protection with low-dose carbon monoxide inhalation : Effects on inflammatory mediators and alloreactive T-cell responses. In: Transplantation. 2006 ; Vol. 81, No. 2. pp. 220-230.
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