Head-down bed rest alters sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to mental stress

Atsunori Kamiya, Satoshi Iwase, Daisaku Michikami, Qi Fu, Tadaaki Mano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Astronauts usually work under much mental stress. However, it is unclear how and whether or not an exposure to microgravity affects physiological response to mental stress in humans. To examine effects of microgravity on vasomotor sympathetic and peripheral vasodilator responses to mental stress, we performed 10 min of mental arithmetic (MA) before and after 14 days of 6°head-down bed rest (HDBR), a ground-based simulation of spaceflight. Total muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA, measured by microneurography) slightly increased during MA before HDBR, and this increase was augmented after HDBR. Calf blood flow (measured by venous occlusion plethysmography) increased and calf vascular resistance (calculated by dividing mean blood pressure by calf blood flow) decreased during MA before HDBR, but these responses were abolished after HDBR. Increases in heart rate and mean blood pressure during MA were not different between before and after HDBR. These findings suggest that HDBR augmented vasomotor sympathoexcitation but attenuated vasodilatation in the calf muscle in response to mental stress.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology
Volume279
Issue number2 48-2
Publication statusPublished - Sep 20 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Weightlessness
Bed Rest
Head
Astronauts
Blood Pressure
Space Flight
Muscles
Plethysmography
Vasodilator Agents
Vasodilation
Vascular Resistance
Heart Rate

Keywords

  • Blood flow
  • Microgravity
  • Muscle sympathetic nerve activity
  • Vascular resistance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Head-down bed rest alters sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to mental stress. / Kamiya, Atsunori; Iwase, Satoshi; Michikami, Daisaku; Fu, Qi; Mano, Tadaaki.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology, Vol. 279, No. 2 48-2, 20.09.2000.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{ec057c3615304c73bf3f73293bd57804,
title = "Head-down bed rest alters sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to mental stress",
abstract = "Astronauts usually work under much mental stress. However, it is unclear how and whether or not an exposure to microgravity affects physiological response to mental stress in humans. To examine effects of microgravity on vasomotor sympathetic and peripheral vasodilator responses to mental stress, we performed 10 min of mental arithmetic (MA) before and after 14 days of 6°head-down bed rest (HDBR), a ground-based simulation of spaceflight. Total muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA, measured by microneurography) slightly increased during MA before HDBR, and this increase was augmented after HDBR. Calf blood flow (measured by venous occlusion plethysmography) increased and calf vascular resistance (calculated by dividing mean blood pressure by calf blood flow) decreased during MA before HDBR, but these responses were abolished after HDBR. Increases in heart rate and mean blood pressure during MA were not different between before and after HDBR. These findings suggest that HDBR augmented vasomotor sympathoexcitation but attenuated vasodilatation in the calf muscle in response to mental stress.",
keywords = "Blood flow, Microgravity, Muscle sympathetic nerve activity, Vascular resistance",
author = "Atsunori Kamiya and Satoshi Iwase and Daisaku Michikami and Qi Fu and Tadaaki Mano",
year = "2000",
month = "9",
day = "20",
language = "English",
volume = "279",
journal = "American Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology",
issn = "0363-6119",
publisher = "American Physiological Society",
number = "2 48-2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Head-down bed rest alters sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to mental stress

AU - Kamiya, Atsunori

AU - Iwase, Satoshi

AU - Michikami, Daisaku

AU - Fu, Qi

AU - Mano, Tadaaki

PY - 2000/9/20

Y1 - 2000/9/20

N2 - Astronauts usually work under much mental stress. However, it is unclear how and whether or not an exposure to microgravity affects physiological response to mental stress in humans. To examine effects of microgravity on vasomotor sympathetic and peripheral vasodilator responses to mental stress, we performed 10 min of mental arithmetic (MA) before and after 14 days of 6°head-down bed rest (HDBR), a ground-based simulation of spaceflight. Total muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA, measured by microneurography) slightly increased during MA before HDBR, and this increase was augmented after HDBR. Calf blood flow (measured by venous occlusion plethysmography) increased and calf vascular resistance (calculated by dividing mean blood pressure by calf blood flow) decreased during MA before HDBR, but these responses were abolished after HDBR. Increases in heart rate and mean blood pressure during MA were not different between before and after HDBR. These findings suggest that HDBR augmented vasomotor sympathoexcitation but attenuated vasodilatation in the calf muscle in response to mental stress.

AB - Astronauts usually work under much mental stress. However, it is unclear how and whether or not an exposure to microgravity affects physiological response to mental stress in humans. To examine effects of microgravity on vasomotor sympathetic and peripheral vasodilator responses to mental stress, we performed 10 min of mental arithmetic (MA) before and after 14 days of 6°head-down bed rest (HDBR), a ground-based simulation of spaceflight. Total muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA, measured by microneurography) slightly increased during MA before HDBR, and this increase was augmented after HDBR. Calf blood flow (measured by venous occlusion plethysmography) increased and calf vascular resistance (calculated by dividing mean blood pressure by calf blood flow) decreased during MA before HDBR, but these responses were abolished after HDBR. Increases in heart rate and mean blood pressure during MA were not different between before and after HDBR. These findings suggest that HDBR augmented vasomotor sympathoexcitation but attenuated vasodilatation in the calf muscle in response to mental stress.

KW - Blood flow

KW - Microgravity

KW - Muscle sympathetic nerve activity

KW - Vascular resistance

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0033857911&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0033857911&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 10938230

AN - SCOPUS:0033857911

VL - 279

JO - American Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology

JF - American Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology

SN - 0363-6119

IS - 2 48-2

ER -