Head cooling during sleep improves sleep quality in the luteal phase in female university students: A randomized crossover-controlled pilot study

Seiji Hamanishi, Eri Eguchi, Tatsuo Ito, Kenjiro Nagaoka, Keiki Ogino

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Although selective head-cooling has been reported to decrease scalp and tympanic temperature and improve sleep quality, whether head-cooling during sleep can improve sleep quality in women during the luteal phase has not been elucidated. This randomized, controlled crossover open trial aimed to investigate the effect of head cooling during sleep on sleep quality in women during the luteal phase. Female university students aged 19–25 years with increased daytime sleepiness during the luteal phase were recruited by poster advertisement at their university from May to June 2016 and from May to June 2017. Fourteen women aged 19–22 years participated in this study. The temperature-controllable cooling sheet containing tubes filled with circulating water was used for head-cooling, and the head-cooling and the controlled temperature were set at 25C and 35C, respectively. Electroencephalogram data were obtained using a single-channel portable electroencephalogram device. The difference in sleep-related variables and tympanic temperature between head-cooling and control were analyzed using a linear mixed model. The proportion of arousal was lower with head cooling than with the control. In contrast, the proportion of non-REM3 and the delta power were higher with head cooling than with the control. The proportion of non-REM2 and non-REM3 among sleep EEG stages were positively and negatively correlated with the mean tympanic temperature during sleep, respectively. However, arousal and REM were not correlated with tympanic temperature. We considered the reduction of arousal time by head-cooling might be related to scalp temperature rather than tympanic temperature. Further, our results suggested that head-cooling also improved subjective sleep comfort. In conclusion, head-cooling during sleep could improve sleep quality in young women during the luteal phase.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0213706
JournalPloS one
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2019

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • General

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