Growth of ringwoodite reaction rims from MgSiO3 perovskite and periclase at 22.5 GPa and 1,800 °C

Akira Shimojuku, Asmaa Boujibar, Daisuke Yamazaki, Takashi Yoshino, Naotaka Tomioka, Junshan Xu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The growth rate of ringwoodite reaction rims between MgSiO3 perovskite and periclase was investigated at 22.5 GPa and 1,800 °C for 1-24 h using the Kawai-type high-pressure apparatus. The reaction was likely to proceed by a diffusion-controlled mechanism in which the dominant diffusion mechanism was grain-boundary diffusion. The reaction constant (the width of the ringwoodite reaction rim squared divided by time) determined from these experiments was between 1.3 × 10-15 and 5.6 × 10-15 m2/s. A Pt inert marker experiment indicated that the MgO component migrated faster than the SiO2 component in ringwoodite. Thus, either Mg or O having the slower diffusion rate controlled the reaction. Because previous diffusion studies have shown that diffusion rates of O are slower than those of Mg, O would be a rate-controlling element for ringwoodite formation from MgSiO3 perovskite and periclase. The growth rate appeared to be too fast to explain the observed topographic rise (~10 km) inside mantle plumes at the 660-km discontinuity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)555-567
Number of pages13
JournalPhysics and Chemistry of Minerals
Volume41
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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ringwoodite
periclase
perovskite
Perovskite
mantle plume
grain boundary
Rate constants
discontinuity
Grain boundaries
experiment
Experiments
rate

Keywords

  • Diffusion
  • Growth kinetics
  • Post-spinel transformation
  • Reaction rim
  • Ringwoodite

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geochemistry and Petrology
  • Materials Science(all)

Cite this

Growth of ringwoodite reaction rims from MgSiO3 perovskite and periclase at 22.5 GPa and 1,800 °C. / Shimojuku, Akira; Boujibar, Asmaa; Yamazaki, Daisuke; Yoshino, Takashi; Tomioka, Naotaka; Xu, Junshan.

In: Physics and Chemistry of Minerals, Vol. 41, No. 7, 2014, p. 555-567.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shimojuku, Akira ; Boujibar, Asmaa ; Yamazaki, Daisuke ; Yoshino, Takashi ; Tomioka, Naotaka ; Xu, Junshan. / Growth of ringwoodite reaction rims from MgSiO3 perovskite and periclase at 22.5 GPa and 1,800 °C. In: Physics and Chemistry of Minerals. 2014 ; Vol. 41, No. 7. pp. 555-567.
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AU - Yoshino, Takashi

AU - Tomioka, Naotaka

AU - Xu, Junshan

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