Growth hormone activates hepatic and cerebral cholesterol metabolism in small-for-gestational age children without catch-up growth

Satoshi Hirayama, Hironori Nagasaka, Saori Nakagawa, Mayuko Takuwa, Mariko Nakacho, Tohru Yorifuji, Hiroki Kondou, Hirokazu Tsukahara, Ichiro Morioka, Akihito Ishida, Susumu Yamato, Takashi Miida

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background Growth hormone (GH) replacement therapy improves hypercholesterolemia in patients with GH deficiency, suggesting that GH modulates cholesterol metabolism. Objectives We examined GH effects on lipid profiles and cholesterol-related markers reflecting hepatic and cerebral cholesterol metabolism in small-for-gestational age (SGA) children without catch-up growth. Methods This study examined SGA children without catch-up growth (n = 22) and healthy children (controls, n = 11). Based on parents’ choice, 11 SGA children received GH at 0.23 to 0.25 mg/kg/d for 6 months, and at 0.34 to 0.36 mg/kg/d for the subsequent 6 months (GH (+) group). The other SGA children received no GH (GH (−) group, n = 11). We ascertained baseline and posttreatment lipid profiles and cholesterol-related markers reflecting hepatic and cerebral cholesterol metabolism. Results Baseline lipid profiles of SGA children and controls were similar. Serum 24S-hydroxycholesterol (marker for cerebral cholesterol metabolism) concentration was 19% lower in SGA children than in controls (P <.05). Compared with baseline, the GH (+) group low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol concentration had decreased by 6.6% during 6 months and 8.8% during 12 months (P <.01), whereas the high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol concentration had increased by 1.7% (P =.07) and 3.3% (P <.01). Serum 7α-hydroxycholesterol (marker for hepatic cholesterol elimination) concentration had increased by 34% at 6 months and 35% at 12 months (P <.01). In addition, 24S-hydroxycholesterol increased by 25% and 26% (P <.001). No marker for cholesterol synthesis or absorption changed. The GH (−) group lipid profiles and oxysterols remained unchanged during the observation period. Conclusion GH activates hepatic and cerebral cholesterol metabolism in SGA children without catch-up growth.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1032-1042
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Clinical Lipidology
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1 2017

Fingerprint

Growth Hormone
Gestational Age
Cholesterol
Liver
Growth
Lipids
Hydroxycholesterols
Hormone Replacement Therapy
Hypercholesterolemia
Serum
LDL Cholesterol
HDL Cholesterol
Parents
Observation

Keywords

  • 24S-hydroxycholesterol
  • 7α-hydroxycholesterol
  • Insulin-like growth factor I
  • Oxysterols

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Growth hormone activates hepatic and cerebral cholesterol metabolism in small-for-gestational age children without catch-up growth. / Hirayama, Satoshi; Nagasaka, Hironori; Nakagawa, Saori; Takuwa, Mayuko; Nakacho, Mariko; Yorifuji, Tohru; Kondou, Hiroki; Tsukahara, Hirokazu; Morioka, Ichiro; Ishida, Akihito; Yamato, Susumu; Miida, Takashi.

In: Journal of Clinical Lipidology, Vol. 11, No. 4, 01.07.2017, p. 1032-1042.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hirayama, S, Nagasaka, H, Nakagawa, S, Takuwa, M, Nakacho, M, Yorifuji, T, Kondou, H, Tsukahara, H, Morioka, I, Ishida, A, Yamato, S & Miida, T 2017, 'Growth hormone activates hepatic and cerebral cholesterol metabolism in small-for-gestational age children without catch-up growth', Journal of Clinical Lipidology, vol. 11, no. 4, pp. 1032-1042. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jacl.2017.05.010
Hirayama, Satoshi ; Nagasaka, Hironori ; Nakagawa, Saori ; Takuwa, Mayuko ; Nakacho, Mariko ; Yorifuji, Tohru ; Kondou, Hiroki ; Tsukahara, Hirokazu ; Morioka, Ichiro ; Ishida, Akihito ; Yamato, Susumu ; Miida, Takashi. / Growth hormone activates hepatic and cerebral cholesterol metabolism in small-for-gestational age children without catch-up growth. In: Journal of Clinical Lipidology. 2017 ; Vol. 11, No. 4. pp. 1032-1042.
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abstract = "Background Growth hormone (GH) replacement therapy improves hypercholesterolemia in patients with GH deficiency, suggesting that GH modulates cholesterol metabolism. Objectives We examined GH effects on lipid profiles and cholesterol-related markers reflecting hepatic and cerebral cholesterol metabolism in small-for-gestational age (SGA) children without catch-up growth. Methods This study examined SGA children without catch-up growth (n = 22) and healthy children (controls, n = 11). Based on parents’ choice, 11 SGA children received GH at 0.23 to 0.25 mg/kg/d for 6 months, and at 0.34 to 0.36 mg/kg/d for the subsequent 6 months (GH (+) group). The other SGA children received no GH (GH (−) group, n = 11). We ascertained baseline and posttreatment lipid profiles and cholesterol-related markers reflecting hepatic and cerebral cholesterol metabolism. Results Baseline lipid profiles of SGA children and controls were similar. Serum 24S-hydroxycholesterol (marker for cerebral cholesterol metabolism) concentration was 19{\%} lower in SGA children than in controls (P <.05). Compared with baseline, the GH (+) group low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol concentration had decreased by 6.6{\%} during 6 months and 8.8{\%} during 12 months (P <.01), whereas the high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol concentration had increased by 1.7{\%} (P =.07) and 3.3{\%} (P <.01). Serum 7α-hydroxycholesterol (marker for hepatic cholesterol elimination) concentration had increased by 34{\%} at 6 months and 35{\%} at 12 months (P <.01). In addition, 24S-hydroxycholesterol increased by 25{\%} and 26{\%} (P <.001). No marker for cholesterol synthesis or absorption changed. The GH (−) group lipid profiles and oxysterols remained unchanged during the observation period. Conclusion GH activates hepatic and cerebral cholesterol metabolism in SGA children without catch-up growth.",
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T1 - Growth hormone activates hepatic and cerebral cholesterol metabolism in small-for-gestational age children without catch-up growth

AU - Hirayama, Satoshi

AU - Nagasaka, Hironori

AU - Nakagawa, Saori

AU - Takuwa, Mayuko

AU - Nakacho, Mariko

AU - Yorifuji, Tohru

AU - Kondou, Hiroki

AU - Tsukahara, Hirokazu

AU - Morioka, Ichiro

AU - Ishida, Akihito

AU - Yamato, Susumu

AU - Miida, Takashi

PY - 2017/7/1

Y1 - 2017/7/1

N2 - Background Growth hormone (GH) replacement therapy improves hypercholesterolemia in patients with GH deficiency, suggesting that GH modulates cholesterol metabolism. Objectives We examined GH effects on lipid profiles and cholesterol-related markers reflecting hepatic and cerebral cholesterol metabolism in small-for-gestational age (SGA) children without catch-up growth. Methods This study examined SGA children without catch-up growth (n = 22) and healthy children (controls, n = 11). Based on parents’ choice, 11 SGA children received GH at 0.23 to 0.25 mg/kg/d for 6 months, and at 0.34 to 0.36 mg/kg/d for the subsequent 6 months (GH (+) group). The other SGA children received no GH (GH (−) group, n = 11). We ascertained baseline and posttreatment lipid profiles and cholesterol-related markers reflecting hepatic and cerebral cholesterol metabolism. Results Baseline lipid profiles of SGA children and controls were similar. Serum 24S-hydroxycholesterol (marker for cerebral cholesterol metabolism) concentration was 19% lower in SGA children than in controls (P <.05). Compared with baseline, the GH (+) group low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol concentration had decreased by 6.6% during 6 months and 8.8% during 12 months (P <.01), whereas the high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol concentration had increased by 1.7% (P =.07) and 3.3% (P <.01). Serum 7α-hydroxycholesterol (marker for hepatic cholesterol elimination) concentration had increased by 34% at 6 months and 35% at 12 months (P <.01). In addition, 24S-hydroxycholesterol increased by 25% and 26% (P <.001). No marker for cholesterol synthesis or absorption changed. The GH (−) group lipid profiles and oxysterols remained unchanged during the observation period. Conclusion GH activates hepatic and cerebral cholesterol metabolism in SGA children without catch-up growth.

AB - Background Growth hormone (GH) replacement therapy improves hypercholesterolemia in patients with GH deficiency, suggesting that GH modulates cholesterol metabolism. Objectives We examined GH effects on lipid profiles and cholesterol-related markers reflecting hepatic and cerebral cholesterol metabolism in small-for-gestational age (SGA) children without catch-up growth. Methods This study examined SGA children without catch-up growth (n = 22) and healthy children (controls, n = 11). Based on parents’ choice, 11 SGA children received GH at 0.23 to 0.25 mg/kg/d for 6 months, and at 0.34 to 0.36 mg/kg/d for the subsequent 6 months (GH (+) group). The other SGA children received no GH (GH (−) group, n = 11). We ascertained baseline and posttreatment lipid profiles and cholesterol-related markers reflecting hepatic and cerebral cholesterol metabolism. Results Baseline lipid profiles of SGA children and controls were similar. Serum 24S-hydroxycholesterol (marker for cerebral cholesterol metabolism) concentration was 19% lower in SGA children than in controls (P <.05). Compared with baseline, the GH (+) group low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol concentration had decreased by 6.6% during 6 months and 8.8% during 12 months (P <.01), whereas the high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol concentration had increased by 1.7% (P =.07) and 3.3% (P <.01). Serum 7α-hydroxycholesterol (marker for hepatic cholesterol elimination) concentration had increased by 34% at 6 months and 35% at 12 months (P <.01). In addition, 24S-hydroxycholesterol increased by 25% and 26% (P <.001). No marker for cholesterol synthesis or absorption changed. The GH (−) group lipid profiles and oxysterols remained unchanged during the observation period. Conclusion GH activates hepatic and cerebral cholesterol metabolism in SGA children without catch-up growth.

KW - 24S-hydroxycholesterol

KW - 7α-hydroxycholesterol

KW - Insulin-like growth factor I

KW - Oxysterols

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