Global SH-wave propagation in a 2D whole Moon model using the parallel hybrid PSM/FDM method

Xianghua Jiang, Yanbin Wang, Yanfang Qin, Hiroshi Takenaka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

We present numerical modeling of SH-wave propagation for the recently proposed whole Moon model and try to improve our understanding of lunar seismic wave propagation. We use a hybrid PSM/FDM method on staggered grids to solve the wave equations and implement the calculation on a parallel PC cluster to improve the computing efficiency. Features of global SH-wave propagation are firstly discussed for a 100-km shallow and 900-km deep moonquakes, respectively. Effects of frequency range and lateral variation of crust thickness are then investigated with various models. Our synthetic waveforms are finally compared with observed Apollo data to show the features of wave propagation that were produced by our model and those not reproduced by our models. Our numerical modeling show that the low-velocity upper crust plays significant role in the development of reverberating wave trains. Increasing frequency enhances the strength and duration of the reverberations. Surface multiples dominate wavefields for shallow event. Core–mantle reflections can be clearly identified for deep event at low frequency. The layered whole Moon model and the low-velocity upper crust produce the reverberating wave trains following each phases consistent with observation. However, more realistic Moon model should be considered in order to explain the strong and slow decay scattering between various phases shown on observation data.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)163-174
Number of pages12
JournalEarthquake Science
Volume28
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 6 2015

Fingerprint

SH waves
Frequency division multiplexing
SH-wave
Moon
moon
Wave propagation
wave propagation
crusts
upper crust
low speed
train
moonquakes
Seismic waves
Reverberation
seismic waves
reverberation
finite difference method
wave equation
Wave equations
seismic wave

Keywords

  • Hybrid method
  • Parallel computing
  • Seismic wavefield
  • SH-wave propagation
  • Whole Moon model

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geology
  • Geophysics
  • Geotechnical Engineering and Engineering Geology

Cite this

Global SH-wave propagation in a 2D whole Moon model using the parallel hybrid PSM/FDM method. / Jiang, Xianghua; Wang, Yanbin; Qin, Yanfang; Takenaka, Hiroshi.

In: Earthquake Science, Vol. 28, No. 3, 06.06.2015, p. 163-174.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jiang, Xianghua ; Wang, Yanbin ; Qin, Yanfang ; Takenaka, Hiroshi. / Global SH-wave propagation in a 2D whole Moon model using the parallel hybrid PSM/FDM method. In: Earthquake Science. 2015 ; Vol. 28, No. 3. pp. 163-174.
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