Giant cell tumor of the spine

Toshihumi Ozaki, Ulf Liljenqvist, Henry Halm, Axel Hillmann, Georg Gosheger, Winfried Winkelmann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Six patients with giant cell tumor of the spine had surgery between 1981 and 1995. Three lesions were located in the serum, two lesions were in the thoracic spine, and one lesion was in the lumbar spine. Preoperatively, all patients had local pain and neurologic symptoms. Two patients had cement implanted after curettage or intralesional excision of the sacral tumor; one patient had a local relapse. After the second curettage and cement implantation, the tumor was controlled. One patient with a sacral lesion had marginal excision and spondylodesis; no relapse developed. Two patients with thoracic lesions had planned marginal excision and spondylodesis; the margins finally became intralesional, but no relapse developed. One patient with a lumbar lesion had incomplete removal of the tumor and received postoperative irradiation. At the final followup (median, 69 months), five of six patients were disease-free and one patient died of disease progression. Two of the five surviving patients had pain after standing or neurologic problems. Although some contamination occurred, planning a marginal excision of the lesion seems beneficial for vertebral lesions above the sacrum. Total sacrectomy of a sacral lesion seems to be too invasive when cement implantation can control the lesion. Department of Orthopaedic Surgery.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)194-201
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Orthopaedics and Related Research
Issue number401
Publication statusPublished - 2002

Fingerprint

Giant Cell Tumors
Spine
Spinal Fusion
Curettage
Recurrence
Thorax
Pain
Sacrum
Neoplasms
Neurologic Manifestations
Nervous System
Orthopedics
Disease Progression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Ozaki, T., Liljenqvist, U., Halm, H., Hillmann, A., Gosheger, G., & Winkelmann, W. (2002). Giant cell tumor of the spine. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, (401), 194-201.

Giant cell tumor of the spine. / Ozaki, Toshihumi; Liljenqvist, Ulf; Halm, Henry; Hillmann, Axel; Gosheger, Georg; Winkelmann, Winfried.

In: Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, No. 401, 2002, p. 194-201.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ozaki, T, Liljenqvist, U, Halm, H, Hillmann, A, Gosheger, G & Winkelmann, W 2002, 'Giant cell tumor of the spine', Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, no. 401, pp. 194-201.
Ozaki T, Liljenqvist U, Halm H, Hillmann A, Gosheger G, Winkelmann W. Giant cell tumor of the spine. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. 2002;(401):194-201.
Ozaki, Toshihumi ; Liljenqvist, Ulf ; Halm, Henry ; Hillmann, Axel ; Gosheger, Georg ; Winkelmann, Winfried. / Giant cell tumor of the spine. In: Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. 2002 ; No. 401. pp. 194-201.
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