Further characterization of ferric - Phytosiderophore transporters ZmYS1 and HvYS1 in maize and barley

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Abstract

Roots of some gramineous plants secrete phytosiderophores in response to iron deficiency and take up Fe as a ferric-phytosiderophore complex through the transporter YS1 (Yellow Stripe 1). Here, this transporter in maize (ZmYS1) and barley (HvYS1) was further characterized and compared in terms of expression pattern, diurnal change, and tissue-type specificity of localization. The expression of HvYS1 was specifically induced by Fe deficiency only in barley roots, and increased with the progress of Fe deficiency, whereas ZmYS1 was expressed in maize in the leaf blades and sheaths, crown, and seminal roots, but not in the hypocotyl. HvYS1 expression was not induced by any other metal deficiency. Furthermore, in maize leaf blades, the expression was higher in the young leaf blades showing severe chlorosis than in the old leaf blades showing no chlorosis. The expression of HvYS1 showed a distinct diurnal rhythm, reaching a maximum before the onset of phytosiderophore secretion. In contrast, ZmYS1 did not show such a rhythm in expression. Immunostaining showed that ZmYS1 was localized in the epidermal cells of both crown and lateral roots, with a polar localization at the distal side of the epidermal cells. In maize leaves, ZmYS1 was localized in mesophyll cells, but not epidermal cells. These differences in gene expression pattern and tissue-type specificity of localization suggest that HvYS1 is only involved in primary Fe acquisition by barley roots, whereas ZmYS1 is involved in both primary Fe acquisition and intracellular transport of iron and other metals in maize.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3513-3520
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Experimental Botany
Volume60
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2009

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Keywords

  • Barley
  • Expression pattern
  • Iron
  • Localization
  • Maize
  • Phytosiderophore
  • Transporter

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Plant Science
  • Physiology

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