Frequency stability measurement of a transfer-cavity-stabilized diode laser by using an optical frequency comb

Satoshi Uetake, K. Matsubara, H. Ito, K. Hayasaka, M. Hosokawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We report results of frequency stability measurements of an extended cavity diode laser (ECDL) whose frequency is stabilized by a non-evacuated scanning transfer cavity. The transfer cavity is locked to a commercial frequency stabilized helium-neon laser. Frequency stability is measured by use of an optical frequency comb. The environmental perturbations (variations of temperature, air pressure, and humidity) are also simultaneously measured. The observed frequency drift of the ECDL is well explained by environmental perturbations. An atmospheric pressure variation, which is difficult to control with a non-evacuated cavity, is mainly affected to the frequency stability. Thus we put the cavity into a simple O-ring sealed (non-evacuated) tube. With this simple O-ring sealed tube, the frequency drift is reduced by a factor of 3, and the Allan variance reaches a value of 2.4×10-10, corresponds to the frequency stability of 83 kHz, at the average time of 3000 s. Since the actual frequency drift is well estimated by simultaneous measurement of the ambient temperature, pressure, and humidity, a feed-forward compensation of frequency drifts is also feasible in order to achieve a higher frequency stability with a simple non-evacuated transfer cavity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)413-419
Number of pages7
JournalApplied Physics B: Lasers and Optics
Volume97
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2009
Externally publishedYes

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frequency stability
semiconductor lasers
cavities
humidity
tubes
helium-neon lasers
perturbation
rings
ambient temperature
atmospheric pressure
scanning
air

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)
  • Physics and Astronomy (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Frequency stability measurement of a transfer-cavity-stabilized diode laser by using an optical frequency comb. / Uetake, Satoshi; Matsubara, K.; Ito, H.; Hayasaka, K.; Hosokawa, M.

In: Applied Physics B: Lasers and Optics, Vol. 97, No. 2, 10.2009, p. 413-419.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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