Fos protein-like immunoreactive neurons induced by electrical stimulation in the trigeminal sensory nuclear complex of rats with chronically injured peripheral nerve

Naoko Fujisawa, Ryuji Terayama, Daisuke Yamaguchi, Shinji Omura, Takashi Yamashiro, Tomosada Sugimoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The rat trigeminal sensory nuclear complex (TSNC) was examined for Fos protein-like immunoreactive (Fos-LI) neurons induced by electrical stimulation (ES) of the lingual nerve (LN) at 2 weeks after injury to the LN or the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN). Intensity-dependent increase in the number of Fos-LI neurons was observed in the subnucleus oralis (Vo) and caudalis (Vc) of the spinal trigeminal tract nucleus irrespective of nerve injury. The number of Fos-LI neurons induced by ES of the chronically injured LN at A-fiber intensity (0.1 mA) was significantly increased in the Vo but not the Vc. On the other hand, in rats with chronically injured IAN, the number of Fos-LI neurons induced by ES of the LN at C-fiber intensity (10 mA) was significantly increased in the Vc but not the Vo. These results indicated that injury of a nerve innervating intraoral structures increased the c-Fos response of Vo neurons to A-fiber intensity ES of the injured nerve. A similar nerve injury enhanced the c-Fos response of Vc neurons to C-fiber intensity ES of a spared uninjured nerve innervating an intraoral territory neighboring that of the injured nerve. The present result show that nerve injury causes differential effects on c-Fos expression in the Vo and Vc, which may explain complexity of neuropathic pain symptoms in clinical cases.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)191-201
Number of pages11
JournalExperimental Brain Research
Volume219
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 1 2012

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Keywords

  • Electrical stimulation
  • Immunohistochemistry
  • Orofacial pain
  • Subnucleus caudalis
  • Subnucleus oralis
  • Trigeminal nerve

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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