Food-aversion conditioning in Japanese monkeys (Macaca fuscata): suppression of key-pressing

Tetsuro Matsuzawa, Yoshinori Hasegawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Monkeys were trained in a Skinner box to press a key for standard food pellets on a fixed-ratio 10 schedule for 30 min. When stable responding had been achieved, two novel foods (almond nuts and marshmallows) were introduced. In the conditioning sessions on the odd-number days, pressing a key delivered one of the two novel foods as the to-be-conditioned target food, and each monkey was injected cyclophosphamide (4 mg/kg) intravenously in the home cage 10 min after the end of the session. In the control sessions on the even-number days, the monkeys earned the other food, and were never injected. As the conditioning was repeated, the monkeys eventually stopped key-pressing for the target food in the conditioning sessions, but continued to work for and eat the other food in the control sessions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)298-303
Number of pages6
JournalBehavioral and Neural Biology
Volume36
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1982
Externally publishedYes

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Macaca
Food
Haplorhini
Althaea
Nuts
Cyclophosphamide
Appointments and Schedules

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology

Cite this

Food-aversion conditioning in Japanese monkeys (Macaca fuscata) : suppression of key-pressing. / Matsuzawa, Tetsuro; Hasegawa, Yoshinori.

In: Behavioral and Neural Biology, Vol. 36, No. 3, 1982, p. 298-303.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Matsuzawa, Tetsuro ; Hasegawa, Yoshinori. / Food-aversion conditioning in Japanese monkeys (Macaca fuscata) : suppression of key-pressing. In: Behavioral and Neural Biology. 1982 ; Vol. 36, No. 3. pp. 298-303.
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