Fluid and mass transfer at subduction interfaces-The field metamorphic record

Gray Edward Bebout, Sarah C. Penniston-Dorland

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

60 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The interface between subducting oceanic slabs and the hanging wall is a structurally and lithologically complex region. Chemically disparate lithologies (sedimentary, mafic and ultramafic rocks) and mechanical mixtures thereof show heterogeneous deformation. These lithologies are tectonically juxtaposed at mm to km scales, particularly in more intensely sheared regions (mélange zones, which act as fluid channelways). This juxtaposition, commonly in the presence of a mobile fluid phase, offers up huge potential for mass transfer and related metasomatic alteration. Fluids in this setting appear capable of transporting mass over scales of kms, along flow paths with widely varying geometries and P-T trajectories. Current models of arc magmatism require km-scale migration of fluids from the interface into mantle wedge magma source regions and implicit in these models is the transport of any fluids generated in the subducting slab along and ultimately through the subduction interface. Field and geochemical studies of high- and ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic rocks elucidate the sources and compositions of fluids in subduction interfaces and the interplay between deformation and fluid and mass transfer in this region.Recent geophysical studies of the subduction interface - its thickness, mineralogy, density, and H2O content - indicate that its rheology greatly influences the ways in which the subducting plate is coupled with the hanging wall. Field investigation of the magnitude and styles of fluid-rock interaction in metamorphic rocks representing "seismogenic zone" depths (and greater) yields insight regarding the roles of fluids and elevated fluid pore pressure in the weakening of plate interface rocks and the deformation leading to seismic events. From a geochemical perspective, the plate interface contributes to shaping the "slab signature" observed in studies of the composition of arc volcanic rocks. Understanding the production of fluids with hybridized chemical/isotopic compositions could improve models aimed at identifying the relative contributions of end-member rock reservoirs through analyses of arc volcanic rocks. Production of rocks rich in hydrous minerals, along the subduction interface, could stabilize H2O to great depths in subduction zones and influence deep-Earth H2O cycling. Enhancement of decarbonation reactions and dissolution by fluid infiltration facilitated by deformation at the interface could influence the C flux from subducting slabs entering the sub-arc mantle wedge and various forearc reservoirs.In this paper, we consider records of fluid and mass transfer at localities representing various depths and structural expressions of evolving paleo-interfaces, ranging widely in structural character, the rock types involved (ultramafic, mafic, sedimentary), and the rheology of these rocks. We stress commonalities in styles of fluid and mass transfer as related to deformation style and the associated geometries of fluid mobility at subduction interfaces. Variations in thermal structure among individual margins will lead to significant differences in not only the rheology of subducting rocks, and thus seismicity, but also the profiles of devolatilization and melting, through the forearc and subarc, and the element/mineral solubilities in any aqueous fluids or silicate melts that are produced. One key factor in considering fluid and mass transfer in the subduction interface, influencing C cycling and other chemical additions to arcs, is the uncertain degree to which sub-crustal ultramafic rocks in downgoing slabs are hydrated and release H2O-rich fluids.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)228-258
Number of pages31
JournalLithos
Volume240-243
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

mass transfer
subduction
Mass transfer
Fluids
fluid
Rocks
slab
rheology
rock
Rheology
Metamorphic rocks
Volcanic rocks
Lithology
hanging wall
ultramafic rock
metamorphic rock
Minerals
volcanic rock
lithology
Chemical analysis

Keywords

  • Earthquakes
  • Fluid flow
  • High-pressure metamorphism
  • Mass transfer
  • Mélange
  • Subduction interface

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geochemistry and Petrology

Cite this

Fluid and mass transfer at subduction interfaces-The field metamorphic record. / Edward Bebout, Gray; Penniston-Dorland, Sarah C.

In: Lithos, Vol. 240-243, 01.01.2016, p. 228-258.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Edward Bebout, Gray ; Penniston-Dorland, Sarah C. / Fluid and mass transfer at subduction interfaces-The field metamorphic record. In: Lithos. 2016 ; Vol. 240-243. pp. 228-258.
@article{ed9cec342b3845e08e42fe819aa02d0e,
title = "Fluid and mass transfer at subduction interfaces-The field metamorphic record",
abstract = "The interface between subducting oceanic slabs and the hanging wall is a structurally and lithologically complex region. Chemically disparate lithologies (sedimentary, mafic and ultramafic rocks) and mechanical mixtures thereof show heterogeneous deformation. These lithologies are tectonically juxtaposed at mm to km scales, particularly in more intensely sheared regions (m{\'e}lange zones, which act as fluid channelways). This juxtaposition, commonly in the presence of a mobile fluid phase, offers up huge potential for mass transfer and related metasomatic alteration. Fluids in this setting appear capable of transporting mass over scales of kms, along flow paths with widely varying geometries and P-T trajectories. Current models of arc magmatism require km-scale migration of fluids from the interface into mantle wedge magma source regions and implicit in these models is the transport of any fluids generated in the subducting slab along and ultimately through the subduction interface. Field and geochemical studies of high- and ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic rocks elucidate the sources and compositions of fluids in subduction interfaces and the interplay between deformation and fluid and mass transfer in this region.Recent geophysical studies of the subduction interface - its thickness, mineralogy, density, and H2O content - indicate that its rheology greatly influences the ways in which the subducting plate is coupled with the hanging wall. Field investigation of the magnitude and styles of fluid-rock interaction in metamorphic rocks representing {"}seismogenic zone{"} depths (and greater) yields insight regarding the roles of fluids and elevated fluid pore pressure in the weakening of plate interface rocks and the deformation leading to seismic events. From a geochemical perspective, the plate interface contributes to shaping the {"}slab signature{"} observed in studies of the composition of arc volcanic rocks. Understanding the production of fluids with hybridized chemical/isotopic compositions could improve models aimed at identifying the relative contributions of end-member rock reservoirs through analyses of arc volcanic rocks. Production of rocks rich in hydrous minerals, along the subduction interface, could stabilize H2O to great depths in subduction zones and influence deep-Earth H2O cycling. Enhancement of decarbonation reactions and dissolution by fluid infiltration facilitated by deformation at the interface could influence the C flux from subducting slabs entering the sub-arc mantle wedge and various forearc reservoirs.In this paper, we consider records of fluid and mass transfer at localities representing various depths and structural expressions of evolving paleo-interfaces, ranging widely in structural character, the rock types involved (ultramafic, mafic, sedimentary), and the rheology of these rocks. We stress commonalities in styles of fluid and mass transfer as related to deformation style and the associated geometries of fluid mobility at subduction interfaces. Variations in thermal structure among individual margins will lead to significant differences in not only the rheology of subducting rocks, and thus seismicity, but also the profiles of devolatilization and melting, through the forearc and subarc, and the element/mineral solubilities in any aqueous fluids or silicate melts that are produced. One key factor in considering fluid and mass transfer in the subduction interface, influencing C cycling and other chemical additions to arcs, is the uncertain degree to which sub-crustal ultramafic rocks in downgoing slabs are hydrated and release H2O-rich fluids.",
keywords = "Earthquakes, Fluid flow, High-pressure metamorphism, Mass transfer, M{\'e}lange, Subduction interface",
author = "{Edward Bebout}, Gray and Penniston-Dorland, {Sarah C.}",
year = "2016",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.lithos.2015.10.007",
language = "English",
volume = "240-243",
pages = "228--258",
journal = "Lithos",
issn = "0024-4937",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Fluid and mass transfer at subduction interfaces-The field metamorphic record

AU - Edward Bebout, Gray

AU - Penniston-Dorland, Sarah C.

PY - 2016/1/1

Y1 - 2016/1/1

N2 - The interface between subducting oceanic slabs and the hanging wall is a structurally and lithologically complex region. Chemically disparate lithologies (sedimentary, mafic and ultramafic rocks) and mechanical mixtures thereof show heterogeneous deformation. These lithologies are tectonically juxtaposed at mm to km scales, particularly in more intensely sheared regions (mélange zones, which act as fluid channelways). This juxtaposition, commonly in the presence of a mobile fluid phase, offers up huge potential for mass transfer and related metasomatic alteration. Fluids in this setting appear capable of transporting mass over scales of kms, along flow paths with widely varying geometries and P-T trajectories. Current models of arc magmatism require km-scale migration of fluids from the interface into mantle wedge magma source regions and implicit in these models is the transport of any fluids generated in the subducting slab along and ultimately through the subduction interface. Field and geochemical studies of high- and ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic rocks elucidate the sources and compositions of fluids in subduction interfaces and the interplay between deformation and fluid and mass transfer in this region.Recent geophysical studies of the subduction interface - its thickness, mineralogy, density, and H2O content - indicate that its rheology greatly influences the ways in which the subducting plate is coupled with the hanging wall. Field investigation of the magnitude and styles of fluid-rock interaction in metamorphic rocks representing "seismogenic zone" depths (and greater) yields insight regarding the roles of fluids and elevated fluid pore pressure in the weakening of plate interface rocks and the deformation leading to seismic events. From a geochemical perspective, the plate interface contributes to shaping the "slab signature" observed in studies of the composition of arc volcanic rocks. Understanding the production of fluids with hybridized chemical/isotopic compositions could improve models aimed at identifying the relative contributions of end-member rock reservoirs through analyses of arc volcanic rocks. Production of rocks rich in hydrous minerals, along the subduction interface, could stabilize H2O to great depths in subduction zones and influence deep-Earth H2O cycling. Enhancement of decarbonation reactions and dissolution by fluid infiltration facilitated by deformation at the interface could influence the C flux from subducting slabs entering the sub-arc mantle wedge and various forearc reservoirs.In this paper, we consider records of fluid and mass transfer at localities representing various depths and structural expressions of evolving paleo-interfaces, ranging widely in structural character, the rock types involved (ultramafic, mafic, sedimentary), and the rheology of these rocks. We stress commonalities in styles of fluid and mass transfer as related to deformation style and the associated geometries of fluid mobility at subduction interfaces. Variations in thermal structure among individual margins will lead to significant differences in not only the rheology of subducting rocks, and thus seismicity, but also the profiles of devolatilization and melting, through the forearc and subarc, and the element/mineral solubilities in any aqueous fluids or silicate melts that are produced. One key factor in considering fluid and mass transfer in the subduction interface, influencing C cycling and other chemical additions to arcs, is the uncertain degree to which sub-crustal ultramafic rocks in downgoing slabs are hydrated and release H2O-rich fluids.

AB - The interface between subducting oceanic slabs and the hanging wall is a structurally and lithologically complex region. Chemically disparate lithologies (sedimentary, mafic and ultramafic rocks) and mechanical mixtures thereof show heterogeneous deformation. These lithologies are tectonically juxtaposed at mm to km scales, particularly in more intensely sheared regions (mélange zones, which act as fluid channelways). This juxtaposition, commonly in the presence of a mobile fluid phase, offers up huge potential for mass transfer and related metasomatic alteration. Fluids in this setting appear capable of transporting mass over scales of kms, along flow paths with widely varying geometries and P-T trajectories. Current models of arc magmatism require km-scale migration of fluids from the interface into mantle wedge magma source regions and implicit in these models is the transport of any fluids generated in the subducting slab along and ultimately through the subduction interface. Field and geochemical studies of high- and ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic rocks elucidate the sources and compositions of fluids in subduction interfaces and the interplay between deformation and fluid and mass transfer in this region.Recent geophysical studies of the subduction interface - its thickness, mineralogy, density, and H2O content - indicate that its rheology greatly influences the ways in which the subducting plate is coupled with the hanging wall. Field investigation of the magnitude and styles of fluid-rock interaction in metamorphic rocks representing "seismogenic zone" depths (and greater) yields insight regarding the roles of fluids and elevated fluid pore pressure in the weakening of plate interface rocks and the deformation leading to seismic events. From a geochemical perspective, the plate interface contributes to shaping the "slab signature" observed in studies of the composition of arc volcanic rocks. Understanding the production of fluids with hybridized chemical/isotopic compositions could improve models aimed at identifying the relative contributions of end-member rock reservoirs through analyses of arc volcanic rocks. Production of rocks rich in hydrous minerals, along the subduction interface, could stabilize H2O to great depths in subduction zones and influence deep-Earth H2O cycling. Enhancement of decarbonation reactions and dissolution by fluid infiltration facilitated by deformation at the interface could influence the C flux from subducting slabs entering the sub-arc mantle wedge and various forearc reservoirs.In this paper, we consider records of fluid and mass transfer at localities representing various depths and structural expressions of evolving paleo-interfaces, ranging widely in structural character, the rock types involved (ultramafic, mafic, sedimentary), and the rheology of these rocks. We stress commonalities in styles of fluid and mass transfer as related to deformation style and the associated geometries of fluid mobility at subduction interfaces. Variations in thermal structure among individual margins will lead to significant differences in not only the rheology of subducting rocks, and thus seismicity, but also the profiles of devolatilization and melting, through the forearc and subarc, and the element/mineral solubilities in any aqueous fluids or silicate melts that are produced. One key factor in considering fluid and mass transfer in the subduction interface, influencing C cycling and other chemical additions to arcs, is the uncertain degree to which sub-crustal ultramafic rocks in downgoing slabs are hydrated and release H2O-rich fluids.

KW - Earthquakes

KW - Fluid flow

KW - High-pressure metamorphism

KW - Mass transfer

KW - Mélange

KW - Subduction interface

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84949266696&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84949266696&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.lithos.2015.10.007

DO - 10.1016/j.lithos.2015.10.007

M3 - Review article

AN - SCOPUS:84949266696

VL - 240-243

SP - 228

EP - 258

JO - Lithos

JF - Lithos

SN - 0024-4937

ER -