Flood risk assessment in vegetated lower Asahi River of Okayama Prefecture in Japan using airborne topo-bathymetric LiDAR and depth-averaged flow model

Keisuke Yoshida, Kimihisa Nagata, Shiro Maeno, Koji Mano, Shinya Nigo, Satoshi Nishiyama, Md Touhidul Islam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This paper describes application of airborne LiDAR bathymetry (ALB) with near-infrared and green pulsed lasers for gathering distributed vegetation conditions and topo-bathymetric data for rivers. For the lower Asahi River of Okayama Prefecture in Japan, the ALB data validity was verified using field observation data. This study also examined the applicability of ALB data for numerical simulations of the lower Asahi River flooding in early July 2018 in Japan, comparing simulated and observed data. Results demonstrated that the methodology for this study works well for parameterization of distributed vegetation on a reach scale. This study also applied numerical tests to investigate the effects of vegetation establishment on flood control plans for the lower Asahi River using parameters validated for flood flow simulations. Results demonstrate that the predicted water level markedly exceeds the high water level because of thick vegetation presently established along few-kilometer-long upstream sections of the targeted river reach. Therefore, we conclude that the present findings can support cost-effective management tasks for vegetated rivers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)39-59
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Hydro-Environment Research
Volume39
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2021

Keywords

  • Distributed flow resistance
  • Flooding
  • Topo-bathymetric LiDAR
  • Vegetation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Flood risk assessment in vegetated lower Asahi River of Okayama Prefecture in Japan using airborne topo-bathymetric LiDAR and depth-averaged flow model'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this