Field-based evidence for devolatilization in subduction zones: Implications for arc magmatism

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Abstract

Metamorphic rocks on Santa Catalina Island, California, afford examination of fluid-related processes at depths of 15 to 45 kilometers in an Early Cretaceous subduction zone. A combination of field, stable isotope, and volatile content data for the Catalina Schist indicates kilometer-scale transport of large amounts of water-rich fluid with uniform oxygen and hydrogen isotope compositions. The fluids were liberated in devolatilizing, relatively low-temperature (400° to 600°C) parts of the subduction zone, primarily by chlorite-breakdown reactions. An evaluation of pertinent phase equilibria indicates that chlorite in mafic and sedimentary rocks and melange may stabilize a large volatile component to great depths (perhaps >100 kilometers), depending on the thermal structure of the subduction zone. This evidence for deep volatile subduction and large-scale flow of slab-derived, water-rich fluids lends credence to models that invoke fluid addition to sites of arc magma genesis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)413-416
Number of pages4
JournalScience
Volume251
Issue number4992
Publication statusPublished - Jan 25 1991
Externally publishedYes

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Oxygen Isotopes
Water
Islands
Isotopes
Hydrogen
Hot Temperature
Temperature
chlorite

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Field-based evidence for devolatilization in subduction zones : Implications for arc magmatism. / Edward Bebout, Gray.

In: Science, Vol. 251, No. 4992, 25.01.1991, p. 413-416.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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