Feeding-related circadian variation in tele-methylhistamine levels of mouse and rat brains

R. Oishi, Y. Itoh, Masahiro Nishibori, K. Saeki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Circadian changes in the brain histamine (HA) and tele-methylhistamine (t-MH) levels were studied in mice and rats after adaptation to an alternating 12-h light/dark cycle (lights on at 0600). Although there was no significant circadian fluctuation of the brain HA levels, the levels of t-MH, a major metabolite of brain HA, showed a marked circadian variation. In mice, the t-MH levels were about 80 ng/g from 1200 to 1800 but about two times higher values were obtained from 2400 to 0600 of the next morning. In rats, the t-MH levels ranged from 24 to 28 ng/g at 0600 and 1200, slightly increased at 1800, and reached at 2400 a peak twice as high as the levels seen during the light period. The t-MH levels again rapidly decreased during the subsequent 3 h. In mice fasted from 1200, the t-MH levels did not increase during the period of darkness. When mice were fed at 1200 after a 24-h fast, a significant increase in the t-MH levels was observed at 1800. There was no significant circadian variation of the HA and t-MH levels in the plasma of mice and rats. These results suggest that circadian variation in brain t-MH levels is related to feeding and possible subsequent changes in elimination of t-MH from the brain and/or turnover of HA in the brain. This phenomenon should be given due attention when HA dynamics in the brain are being assessed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)541-547
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Neurochemistry
Volume49
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 1987

Fingerprint

Rats
Brain
Histamine
tele-methylhistamine
Light
Darkness
Photoperiod
Metabolites
Plasmas

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Feeding-related circadian variation in tele-methylhistamine levels of mouse and rat brains. / Oishi, R.; Itoh, Y.; Nishibori, Masahiro; Saeki, K.

In: Journal of Neurochemistry, Vol. 49, No. 2, 1987, p. 541-547.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{6f1b3382a93d4047aa2e82e489cfd0ed,
title = "Feeding-related circadian variation in tele-methylhistamine levels of mouse and rat brains",
abstract = "Circadian changes in the brain histamine (HA) and tele-methylhistamine (t-MH) levels were studied in mice and rats after adaptation to an alternating 12-h light/dark cycle (lights on at 0600). Although there was no significant circadian fluctuation of the brain HA levels, the levels of t-MH, a major metabolite of brain HA, showed a marked circadian variation. In mice, the t-MH levels were about 80 ng/g from 1200 to 1800 but about two times higher values were obtained from 2400 to 0600 of the next morning. In rats, the t-MH levels ranged from 24 to 28 ng/g at 0600 and 1200, slightly increased at 1800, and reached at 2400 a peak twice as high as the levels seen during the light period. The t-MH levels again rapidly decreased during the subsequent 3 h. In mice fasted from 1200, the t-MH levels did not increase during the period of darkness. When mice were fed at 1200 after a 24-h fast, a significant increase in the t-MH levels was observed at 1800. There was no significant circadian variation of the HA and t-MH levels in the plasma of mice and rats. These results suggest that circadian variation in brain t-MH levels is related to feeding and possible subsequent changes in elimination of t-MH from the brain and/or turnover of HA in the brain. This phenomenon should be given due attention when HA dynamics in the brain are being assessed.",
author = "R. Oishi and Y. Itoh and Masahiro Nishibori and K. Saeki",
year = "1987",
language = "English",
volume = "49",
pages = "541--547",
journal = "Journal of Neurochemistry",
issn = "0022-3042",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Feeding-related circadian variation in tele-methylhistamine levels of mouse and rat brains

AU - Oishi, R.

AU - Itoh, Y.

AU - Nishibori, Masahiro

AU - Saeki, K.

PY - 1987

Y1 - 1987

N2 - Circadian changes in the brain histamine (HA) and tele-methylhistamine (t-MH) levels were studied in mice and rats after adaptation to an alternating 12-h light/dark cycle (lights on at 0600). Although there was no significant circadian fluctuation of the brain HA levels, the levels of t-MH, a major metabolite of brain HA, showed a marked circadian variation. In mice, the t-MH levels were about 80 ng/g from 1200 to 1800 but about two times higher values were obtained from 2400 to 0600 of the next morning. In rats, the t-MH levels ranged from 24 to 28 ng/g at 0600 and 1200, slightly increased at 1800, and reached at 2400 a peak twice as high as the levels seen during the light period. The t-MH levels again rapidly decreased during the subsequent 3 h. In mice fasted from 1200, the t-MH levels did not increase during the period of darkness. When mice were fed at 1200 after a 24-h fast, a significant increase in the t-MH levels was observed at 1800. There was no significant circadian variation of the HA and t-MH levels in the plasma of mice and rats. These results suggest that circadian variation in brain t-MH levels is related to feeding and possible subsequent changes in elimination of t-MH from the brain and/or turnover of HA in the brain. This phenomenon should be given due attention when HA dynamics in the brain are being assessed.

AB - Circadian changes in the brain histamine (HA) and tele-methylhistamine (t-MH) levels were studied in mice and rats after adaptation to an alternating 12-h light/dark cycle (lights on at 0600). Although there was no significant circadian fluctuation of the brain HA levels, the levels of t-MH, a major metabolite of brain HA, showed a marked circadian variation. In mice, the t-MH levels were about 80 ng/g from 1200 to 1800 but about two times higher values were obtained from 2400 to 0600 of the next morning. In rats, the t-MH levels ranged from 24 to 28 ng/g at 0600 and 1200, slightly increased at 1800, and reached at 2400 a peak twice as high as the levels seen during the light period. The t-MH levels again rapidly decreased during the subsequent 3 h. In mice fasted from 1200, the t-MH levels did not increase during the period of darkness. When mice were fed at 1200 after a 24-h fast, a significant increase in the t-MH levels was observed at 1800. There was no significant circadian variation of the HA and t-MH levels in the plasma of mice and rats. These results suggest that circadian variation in brain t-MH levels is related to feeding and possible subsequent changes in elimination of t-MH from the brain and/or turnover of HA in the brain. This phenomenon should be given due attention when HA dynamics in the brain are being assessed.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0023179245&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0023179245&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 3598584

AN - SCOPUS:0023179245

VL - 49

SP - 541

EP - 547

JO - Journal of Neurochemistry

JF - Journal of Neurochemistry

SN - 0022-3042

IS - 2

ER -