Faecal transplantation for the treatment of Clostridium difficile infection in a marmoset

Yumiko Yamazaki, Shinpei Kawarai, Hidetoshi Morita, Takefumi Kikusui, Atsushi Iriki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The common marmoset has been used as an experimental animal for various purposes. Because its average weight ranges from 250 to 500 g, weight loss quickly becomes critical for sick animals. Therefore, effective and non-stressful treatment for chronic diseases, including diarrhoea, is essential. Case presentation: We report a case in which faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) led to immediate recovery from chronic and recurrent diarrhoea caused by Clostridium difficile infection. A male common marmoset experienced chronic diarrhoea after antibiotic treatments. The animal experienced severe weight loss, and a faecal sample was confirmed to be C. difficile-positive but was negative for protozoa. Metronidazole was partially effective at the first administration but not after the recurrence of the clinical signs. Then, oral FMT was administered to the subject by feeding fresh faeces from healthy individuals mixed with the marmoset's usual food. We monitored the faeces by categorization into four groups: normal, loose, diarrhoea, and watery. After the first day of FMT treatment, the marmoset underwent a remarkable recovery from diarrhoea, and after the fourth day of treatment, a test for C. difficile was negative. The clinical signs did not recur. The marmoset recovered from sinusitis and bilateral dacryocystitis, which also did not recur, as a by-product of the improvement in its general health caused by the cessation of diarrhoea after the FMT. Conclusion: This is the first reported case of successful treatment of a marmoset using oral FMT. As seen in human patients, FMT was effective for the treatment of recurrent C. difficile infection in a captive marmoset.

Original languageEnglish
Article number150
JournalBMC Veterinary Research
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 31 2017

Fingerprint

Clostridium Infections
Clostridium difficile
Callithrix
Callitrichidae
diarrhea
Diarrhea
infection
Callithrix jacchus
mouth
Feces
weight loss
Therapeutics
product improvement
feces
Weight Loss
sinusitis
metronidazole
Dacryocystitis
chronic diseases
Sinusitis

Keywords

  • Clostridium difficile
  • Common marmoset
  • Diarrhoea
  • Faecal microbiota transplantation
  • Metronidazole

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Faecal transplantation for the treatment of Clostridium difficile infection in a marmoset. / Yamazaki, Yumiko; Kawarai, Shinpei; Morita, Hidetoshi; Kikusui, Takefumi; Iriki, Atsushi.

In: BMC Veterinary Research, Vol. 13, No. 1, 150, 31.05.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yamazaki, Yumiko ; Kawarai, Shinpei ; Morita, Hidetoshi ; Kikusui, Takefumi ; Iriki, Atsushi. / Faecal transplantation for the treatment of Clostridium difficile infection in a marmoset. In: BMC Veterinary Research. 2017 ; Vol. 13, No. 1.
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