Factors associated with perceived feasibility and willingness of non-psychiatric doctors in Japan to treat depressed patients

Masatoshi Inagaki, Tsuyuka Ohtsuki, Fuminobu Ishikura, Manami Kodaka, Yoichiro Watanabe, Mitsuhiko Yamada

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Objectives: We previously reported that many non-psychiatric doctors in Japan believe that treating depression was not part of their duties. Educational interventions must address motivation of physicians to play a role in depression care. In this study, we explored factors associated with perceived feasibility and willingness of non-psychiatric doctors in Japan to treat depression. Methods: The study population included non-psychiatric doctors of the General Physician-Psychiatrist (G-P)Network group in Japan. We explored perceived feasibility and willingness to treat depressed patients, and examined preliminary associations with attitudes toward depression (the Depression Attitude Questionnaire: DAQ) and current depression treatment in routine medical practice. Results: Responses were obtained from 56 non-psychiatric doctors (response rate: 35.4%). The doctors who scored high on the " Professional" and "Pessimism" subscale of the DAQ believed that treating depressed patients was not feasible (χ2 = 13.6, p <0.01; χ2 = 7.3, p <0.05, respectively) and were not willing to treat depressed patients (χ2 =9.4, p <0.01; χ2 = 6.6, p <0.05, respectively) as part of their routine medical practice. The doctors who scored high on the "Professional" subscale referred fewer depressed patients to psychiatrists (r = -0.33, p <0.05), and those who scored high on the "Pessimism" subscale recognized fewer depressed patients (r = -0.39, p <0.01). Conclusions: The present study showed that attitudes toward depression were associated with perceived feasibility and willingness to treat depressed patients and with under-diagnosis of depression. Educational interventions optimized for these attitudes should be developed to improve recognition and treatment of depression in Japan.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)153-167
Number of pages15
JournalInternational Journal of Psychiatry in Medicine
Volume46
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2013

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Japan
Depression
Psychiatry
Physicians
Motivation
Therapeutics
Population

Keywords

  • attitude
  • collaboration
  • depression
  • general physician
  • General Physician-Psychiatrist Network

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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Factors associated with perceived feasibility and willingness of non-psychiatric doctors in Japan to treat depressed patients. / Inagaki, Masatoshi; Ohtsuki, Tsuyuka; Ishikura, Fuminobu; Kodaka, Manami; Watanabe, Yoichiro; Yamada, Mitsuhiko.

In: International Journal of Psychiatry in Medicine, Vol. 46, No. 2, 01.01.2013, p. 153-167.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Inagaki, Masatoshi ; Ohtsuki, Tsuyuka ; Ishikura, Fuminobu ; Kodaka, Manami ; Watanabe, Yoichiro ; Yamada, Mitsuhiko. / Factors associated with perceived feasibility and willingness of non-psychiatric doctors in Japan to treat depressed patients. In: International Journal of Psychiatry in Medicine. 2013 ; Vol. 46, No. 2. pp. 153-167.
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abstract = "Objectives: We previously reported that many non-psychiatric doctors in Japan believe that treating depression was not part of their duties. Educational interventions must address motivation of physicians to play a role in depression care. In this study, we explored factors associated with perceived feasibility and willingness of non-psychiatric doctors in Japan to treat depression. Methods: The study population included non-psychiatric doctors of the General Physician-Psychiatrist (G-P)Network group in Japan. We explored perceived feasibility and willingness to treat depressed patients, and examined preliminary associations with attitudes toward depression (the Depression Attitude Questionnaire: DAQ) and current depression treatment in routine medical practice. Results: Responses were obtained from 56 non-psychiatric doctors (response rate: 35.4{\%}). The doctors who scored high on the {"} Professional{"} and {"}Pessimism{"} subscale of the DAQ believed that treating depressed patients was not feasible (χ2 = 13.6, p <0.01; χ2 = 7.3, p <0.05, respectively) and were not willing to treat depressed patients (χ2 =9.4, p <0.01; χ2 = 6.6, p <0.05, respectively) as part of their routine medical practice. The doctors who scored high on the {"}Professional{"} subscale referred fewer depressed patients to psychiatrists (r = -0.33, p <0.05), and those who scored high on the {"}Pessimism{"} subscale recognized fewer depressed patients (r = -0.39, p <0.01). Conclusions: The present study showed that attitudes toward depression were associated with perceived feasibility and willingness to treat depressed patients and with under-diagnosis of depression. Educational interventions optimized for these attitudes should be developed to improve recognition and treatment of depression in Japan.",
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